Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

THE TREATMENT OF BACTERIAL DISEASES BY VACCINES.

THE TREATMENT OF BACTERIAL DISEASES BY VACCINES. The discovery of the diphtheria antitoxin at the end of the last century gave rise to hopes regarding the treatment of other bacterial diseases, which were soon dashed to the ground. In the years succeeding the discovery of diphtheria antitoxin, a mass of facts bearing on the general subject of infection was collected, and bacteriologists soon realized that bacteria secreting so-called exotoxins were very much in the minority. Most of the bacterial infections to which the flesh is heir are due to germs which produce endotoxins which cannot be combated by the methods used against diphtheria, botulism and tetanus. In his introduction of tuberculin, Koch was the first to suggest a procedure having in view the destruction within the body of an endotoxin-producing organism, the tubercle bacillus. The failure of this treatment, under Koch's own method of administration, is known to all, and has led to its almost complete abandonment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE TREATMENT OF BACTERIAL DISEASES BY VACCINES.

JAMA , Volume XLV (26) – Dec 23, 1905

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-treatment-of-bacterial-diseases-by-vaccines-KdJLUQqyka
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02510260044006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The discovery of the diphtheria antitoxin at the end of the last century gave rise to hopes regarding the treatment of other bacterial diseases, which were soon dashed to the ground. In the years succeeding the discovery of diphtheria antitoxin, a mass of facts bearing on the general subject of infection was collected, and bacteriologists soon realized that bacteria secreting so-called exotoxins were very much in the minority. Most of the bacterial infections to which the flesh is heir are due to germs which produce endotoxins which cannot be combated by the methods used against diphtheria, botulism and tetanus. In his introduction of tuberculin, Koch was the first to suggest a procedure having in view the destruction within the body of an endotoxin-producing organism, the tubercle bacillus. The failure of this treatment, under Koch's own method of administration, is known to all, and has led to its almost complete abandonment.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 23, 1905

There are no references for this article.