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THE TREATMENT OF ADENOID VEGETATIONS OF THE NASOPHARYNX.

THE TREATMENT OF ADENOID VEGETATIONS OF THE NASOPHARYNX. Medical treatment usually is ineffective as far as reduction of the growths is concerned, but as there is often an undoubted connection between lymphoid enlargements in childhood and future tuberculosis of the lung, much can be done to prevent this by general means. The surgical treatment of adenoid vegetation is the one to be considered, therefore, and the first subject that presents itself is whether it is better to employ general anesthesia in operations for removal of the hypertrophied pharyngeal tonsil or not. The advantages of operation without anesthesia are avoidance of the dangers of enforced insensibility, the fact that the operation loses much of its formidable appearance to the child's parents, and the absence of the disagreeable after-effects of anesthesia. The objections to operation without an anesthetic are many. The first is the pain inflicted. It is comfortable for the operator to imagine that the nasopharynx is not especially http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE TREATMENT OF ADENOID VEGETATIONS OF THE NASOPHARYNX.

JAMA , Volume XXXV (21) – Nov 24, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24620470030001j
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Medical treatment usually is ineffective as far as reduction of the growths is concerned, but as there is often an undoubted connection between lymphoid enlargements in childhood and future tuberculosis of the lung, much can be done to prevent this by general means. The surgical treatment of adenoid vegetation is the one to be considered, therefore, and the first subject that presents itself is whether it is better to employ general anesthesia in operations for removal of the hypertrophied pharyngeal tonsil or not. The advantages of operation without anesthesia are avoidance of the dangers of enforced insensibility, the fact that the operation loses much of its formidable appearance to the child's parents, and the absence of the disagreeable after-effects of anesthesia. The objections to operation without an anesthetic are many. The first is the pain inflicted. It is comfortable for the operator to imagine that the nasopharynx is not especially

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 24, 1900

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