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THE TRANSVERSE SINUS AND ITS RELATION TO CHOKED DISK

THE TRANSVERSE SINUS AND ITS RELATION TO CHOKED DISK Abstract Since Turk in 1853 called attention to retinal congestion and hemorrhages in all tumors of the brain, and von Graefe in 1860 described "choked disk" and attributed the condition to pressure, either direct or indirect, against the cavernous sinuses, both opththalmologists and neurologists have tried to explain, through various theories and many experiments, the actual mechanism whereby the disk becomes congested, edematous and, finally, choked. In a previous paper1 attention was called to the various theories and a return to the mechanical theory was suggested as the probable, or at least a reasonable, solution to the problem. In that paper no effort was made to explain the absence of choked disk in certain cases of tumor of the brain in which normally one would expect to find a marked choking, for instance, in tumors of the cerebellopontile angle, but I believe that a reasonable explanation can be found References 1. Swift, G. W. : Choked Disk in Intracranial Lesions: The Mechanical Factors in its Causation , Northwest Med. 26:579 ( (Dec.) ) 1927. 2. Streeter, G. L.: The Development of the Venous Sinuses of the Dura Mater in the Human Embryo , Am. J. Anat. , 1915, vol. 18. 3. Braun, Alfred : Sinus Thrombophlebitis : Inflammatory Diseases of the Venous Sinuses of the Dura Mater , 1928. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

THE TRANSVERSE SINUS AND ITS RELATION TO CHOKED DISK

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 1, 1930

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1930.00810030055003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Since Turk in 1853 called attention to retinal congestion and hemorrhages in all tumors of the brain, and von Graefe in 1860 described "choked disk" and attributed the condition to pressure, either direct or indirect, against the cavernous sinuses, both opththalmologists and neurologists have tried to explain, through various theories and many experiments, the actual mechanism whereby the disk becomes congested, edematous and, finally, choked. In a previous paper1 attention was called to the various theories and a return to the mechanical theory was suggested as the probable, or at least a reasonable, solution to the problem. In that paper no effort was made to explain the absence of choked disk in certain cases of tumor of the brain in which normally one would expect to find a marked choking, for instance, in tumors of the cerebellopontile angle, but I believe that a reasonable explanation can be found References 1. Swift, G. W. : Choked Disk in Intracranial Lesions: The Mechanical Factors in its Causation , Northwest Med. 26:579 ( (Dec.) ) 1927. 2. Streeter, G. L.: The Development of the Venous Sinuses of the Dura Mater in the Human Embryo , Am. J. Anat. , 1915, vol. 18. 3. Braun, Alfred : Sinus Thrombophlebitis : Inflammatory Diseases of the Venous Sinuses of the Dura Mater , 1928.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1930

References

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