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The Theory of Binocular Vision

The Theory of Binocular Vision This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Few books remain pertinent for over 100 years. One such book, however, is Hering's contribution to binocular vision. Ewald Hering was one of the giants of sensory physiology. He was successively professor of physiology at the University of Vienna, the University of Prague, and the University of Leipzig. This book is about the neurological control of ocular movements. Hering's principal concept is that the eye movements are governed by one neurological control system that commands the "double eye" as a single organ. In general, the nativistic theories that Hering presents put him in opposition to the great empiricist, Hermann von Helmholtz. We are all indebted to the two outstanding visual scientists from the University of California, B. Bridgeman and L. Stark, who translated and edited this masterpiece. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Theory of Binocular Vision

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 95 (11) – Nov 1, 1977

The Theory of Binocular Vision

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Few books remain pertinent for over 100 years. One such book, however, is Hering's contribution to binocular vision. Ewald Hering was one of the giants of sensory physiology. He was successively professor of physiology at the University of Vienna, the University of Prague, and the University of Leipzig. This book is about the neurological control...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1977.04450110176036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Few books remain pertinent for over 100 years. One such book, however, is Hering's contribution to binocular vision. Ewald Hering was one of the giants of sensory physiology. He was successively professor of physiology at the University of Vienna, the University of Prague, and the University of Leipzig. This book is about the neurological control of ocular movements. Hering's principal concept is that the eye movements are governed by one neurological control system that commands the "double eye" as a single organ. In general, the nativistic theories that Hering presents put him in opposition to the great empiricist, Hermann von Helmholtz. We are all indebted to the two outstanding visual scientists from the University of California, B. Bridgeman and L. Stark, who translated and edited this masterpiece.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1977

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