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The Teaching of Interns

The Teaching of Interns Abstract To the Editor.— The recent article by Nerenz et al1 helped highlight the role of residents (PGY2 and PGY3) as the primary teachers in internal medicine training programs. The data given by Nerenz and colleagues showed that residents spent almost four times as much time in bedside teaching of interns (45 minutes) than did attending physicians (12 minutes) during an on-call period. Moreover, almost all bedside teaching after 5 PM was done by residents.The role of residents as the primary teachers of interns goes further. The majority of procedures that an intern learns, from venipuncture to lumbar puncture, are taught by residents. Moreover, although there are little data available on this question, most doctors' orders on house staff services are written by interns alone or under the direction of more senior residents. Given this picture, it is not surprising that many interns come to dread attending rounds as References 1. Nerenz D, Rosman H, Newcomb C. The on-call experience of interns in internal medicine . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:2294-2297.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The Teaching of Interns

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (7) – Jul 1, 1991

The Teaching of Interns

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— The recent article by Nerenz et al1 helped highlight the role of residents (PGY2 and PGY3) as the primary teachers in internal medicine training programs. The data given by Nerenz and colleagues showed that residents spent almost four times as much time in bedside teaching of interns (45 minutes) than did attending physicians (12 minutes) during an on-call period. Moreover, almost all bedside teaching after 5 PM was done by residents.The role of residents as the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400070198033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— The recent article by Nerenz et al1 helped highlight the role of residents (PGY2 and PGY3) as the primary teachers in internal medicine training programs. The data given by Nerenz and colleagues showed that residents spent almost four times as much time in bedside teaching of interns (45 minutes) than did attending physicians (12 minutes) during an on-call period. Moreover, almost all bedside teaching after 5 PM was done by residents.The role of residents as the primary teachers of interns goes further. The majority of procedures that an intern learns, from venipuncture to lumbar puncture, are taught by residents. Moreover, although there are little data available on this question, most doctors' orders on house staff services are written by interns alone or under the direction of more senior residents. Given this picture, it is not surprising that many interns come to dread attending rounds as References 1. Nerenz D, Rosman H, Newcomb C. The on-call experience of interns in internal medicine . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:2294-2297.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1991

References