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The Surgical Complications and Sequels of Typhoid Fever.

The Surgical Complications and Sequels of Typhoid Fever. "The province of the physician and that of the surgeon," say the authors, " are in general sufficiently sharply defined and differentiated, yet they have many points of contact. While some diseases belong exclusively to the province of the one and some of them to the other, other diseases may fall with equal propriety under the care of either practitioner. Still another class of cases from the beginning, in the domain of medicine may terminate in that of surgery, and we may lack a very complete history from the very fact of this division of their care and interest. Among the diseases classed as strictly medical, none deserve the appellation more definitely than the continued fevers, especially typhoid fever; yet the present work shows that these fevers are not infrequently the cause of the gravest and least expected surgical troubles, mention of which is generally omitted even in our best text-books http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Surgical Complications and Sequels of Typhoid Fever.

JAMA , Volume XXX (15) – Apr 9, 1898

The Surgical Complications and Sequels of Typhoid Fever.

Abstract


"The province of the physician and that of the surgeon," say the authors, " are in general sufficiently sharply defined and differentiated, yet they have many points of contact. While some diseases belong exclusively to the province of the one and some of them to the other, other diseases may fall with equal propriety under the care of either practitioner. Still another class of cases from the beginning, in the domain of medicine may terminate in that of surgery, and...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.02440670063022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"The province of the physician and that of the surgeon," say the authors, " are in general sufficiently sharply defined and differentiated, yet they have many points of contact. While some diseases belong exclusively to the province of the one and some of them to the other, other diseases may fall with equal propriety under the care of either practitioner. Still another class of cases from the beginning, in the domain of medicine may terminate in that of surgery, and we may lack a very complete history from the very fact of this division of their care and interest. Among the diseases classed as strictly medical, none deserve the appellation more definitely than the continued fevers, especially typhoid fever; yet the present work shows that these fevers are not infrequently the cause of the gravest and least expected surgical troubles, mention of which is generally omitted even in our best text-books

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 9, 1898

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