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THE SURGICAL ASPECTS OF MAJOR NEURALGIA OF THE TRIGEMINAL NERVE.

THE SURGICAL ASPECTS OF MAJOR NEURALGIA OF THE TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Case 3. —Alex. D., a Polish shoemaker, 38 years of age, entered the Johns Hopkins Hospital for the second time in January, 1900. History. —His neuralgia was of comparatively short duration, having been present for only two years. It had originated in the supraorbital territory, had invaded the second division the following year, and in March, 1899, a peripheral neurectomy of the supraorbital and infraorbital nerves was performed. This had given him only temporary relief and after a few months the pain returned and the lower, third division, had begun to transmit impulses of pain. There was also a suboccipital extension. The case was a typical one of tic douloureux with an involvement of all three divisions of the right side, but was not an instance of the extreme type of the disease. Operation. —January 15, 1900. Chloroform. The zygoma was not excised in this case. Enucleation of the ganglion (Fig. 10) presented no great difficulties, although it was my first experience with a bloody case. The wound was sufficiently dry after the extirpation to justify closure without drainage. The pulse during the operation was slowed to 50 beats a minute. Tissues examined by Dr. Barker.11 Postoperative Notes. —Convalescence promised to be uninterrupted. The highest recorded temperature was 100 degrees the day after the operation. Healing occurred by primary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE SURGICAL ASPECTS OF MAJOR NEURALGIA OF THE TRIGEMINAL NERVE.

JAMA , Volume XLIV (12) – Mar 25, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.92500390004001a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Case 3. —Alex. D., a Polish shoemaker, 38 years of age, entered the Johns Hopkins Hospital for the second time in January, 1900. History. —His neuralgia was of comparatively short duration, having been present for only two years. It had originated in the supraorbital territory, had invaded the second division the following year, and in March, 1899, a peripheral neurectomy of the supraorbital and infraorbital nerves was performed. This had given him only temporary relief and after a few months the pain returned and the lower, third division, had begun to transmit impulses of pain. There was also a suboccipital extension. The case was a typical one of tic douloureux with an involvement of all three divisions of the right side, but was not an instance of the extreme type of the disease. Operation. —January 15, 1900. Chloroform. The zygoma was not excised in this case. Enucleation of the ganglion (Fig. 10) presented no great difficulties, although it was my first experience with a bloody case. The wound was sufficiently dry after the extirpation to justify closure without drainage. The pulse during the operation was slowed to 50 beats a minute. Tissues examined by Dr. Barker.11 Postoperative Notes. —Convalescence promised to be uninterrupted. The highest recorded temperature was 100 degrees the day after the operation. Healing occurred by primary

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 25, 1905

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