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The Success of State Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease

The Success of State Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease Opinion EDITORIAL The Success of State Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH, MS; Wendy K. K. Lam, PhD; Joseph A. Bocchini Jr, MD Newborn screening was developed more than 50 years ago ing this screening would result in reduced infant cardiac mor- bidity or mortality was not known at the time. as a way to prevent developmental disability associated with untreated phenylketonuria through early detection and In this issue of JAMA, Abouk and colleagues present treatment. Since then, new- findings from an analysis using the US Period Linked Birth/ born screening has expanded Infant Death Data Set. Between August 2011 and June 2013, to include dozens of condi- 8 states implemented mandatory critical congenital heart Related article page 2111 tions that, if not identified in disease screening policies, 5 had voluntary policies, and 9 early infancy, are associated with significant morbidity and adopted but had not yet implemented mandatory policies. mortality. In the United States, each state is responsible for Between 2007 and 2013, mandated newborn screening for determining which conditions should be included in screen- critical congenital heart disease was associated with an abso- ing. Adding a condition to a state http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Success of State Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease

JAMA , Volume 318 (21) – Dec 5, 2017

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2017.17626
pmid
29209703
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL The Success of State Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH, MS; Wendy K. K. Lam, PhD; Joseph A. Bocchini Jr, MD Newborn screening was developed more than 50 years ago ing this screening would result in reduced infant cardiac mor- bidity or mortality was not known at the time. as a way to prevent developmental disability associated with untreated phenylketonuria through early detection and In this issue of JAMA, Abouk and colleagues present treatment. Since then, new- findings from an analysis using the US Period Linked Birth/ born screening has expanded Infant Death Data Set. Between August 2011 and June 2013, to include dozens of condi- 8 states implemented mandatory critical congenital heart Related article page 2111 tions that, if not identified in disease screening policies, 5 had voluntary policies, and 9 early infancy, are associated with significant morbidity and adopted but had not yet implemented mandatory policies. mortality. In the United States, each state is responsible for Between 2007 and 2013, mandated newborn screening for determining which conditions should be included in screen- critical congenital heart disease was associated with an abso- ing. Adding a condition to a state

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 5, 2017

References