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The Speed of the Retinoscopic Reflex

The Speed of the Retinoscopic Reflex Abstract Retinoscopy has, over the years, become increasingly accepted as a valuable technique. Most refractionists employ it regularly, each putting more or less emphasis on it according to the scheme of refraction he follows. Even the arguments concerning the name of the process have died away and, in this country, voices are rarely lifted to point out the fallacy of the term "retinoscopy" and to advance some more rational name such as "skiascopy" or "korescopy." Once more usage has triumphed over purism. In view of the great expenditure of time and effort made daily by refractionists plying retinoscopes, it is surprising that so little is written on the subject. Duke-Elder1 characteristically gives an excellent presentation of the subject and indicates quite clearly the reasons for the alterations in speed of the reflex. He does not, however, set forth the equations which would allow one to calculate the speed. I shall References 1. Duke-Elder, S. W.: Text-Book of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1939, Vol. 1, pp. 790-794. 2. Southall, James, P. C.: The Optical Theory of Skiascopy , J. Optic. Soc. Amer. (No. (3) ) 13: 245-266, (Sept.) 1926.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Speed of the Retinoscopic Reflex

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 65 (6) – Jun 1, 1961

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1961.01840020787005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Retinoscopy has, over the years, become increasingly accepted as a valuable technique. Most refractionists employ it regularly, each putting more or less emphasis on it according to the scheme of refraction he follows. Even the arguments concerning the name of the process have died away and, in this country, voices are rarely lifted to point out the fallacy of the term "retinoscopy" and to advance some more rational name such as "skiascopy" or "korescopy." Once more usage has triumphed over purism. In view of the great expenditure of time and effort made daily by refractionists plying retinoscopes, it is surprising that so little is written on the subject. Duke-Elder1 characteristically gives an excellent presentation of the subject and indicates quite clearly the reasons for the alterations in speed of the reflex. He does not, however, set forth the equations which would allow one to calculate the speed. I shall References 1. Duke-Elder, S. W.: Text-Book of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1939, Vol. 1, pp. 790-794. 2. Southall, James, P. C.: The Optical Theory of Skiascopy , J. Optic. Soc. Amer. (No. (3) ) 13: 245-266, (Sept.) 1926.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1961

References