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The Shaken Infant: A Military Connection?

The Shaken Infant: A Military Connection? Abstract Several recent studies1-5 have focused on the pathophysiological features, diagnostic procedures, and criteria of the shaken baby syndrome. Brenner et al6 noted that demographic information on shaken infants and their families is scarce. We were impressed with the seemingly large proportion of children of military families (military dependents) in the population of shaken infants seen at our hospital. Limited prior research has produced divergent conclusions as to whether military dependents are at higher risk of child maltreatment.7 The purpose of our study was to investigate whether military dependents were overrepresented among children hospitalized with shaken baby syndrome and if their pattern of injury or outcomes differed from those of children in the civilian population. Methods. We reviewed the charts of all infants with a diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome between January 1, 1989, and February 28, 1993, at the University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill. Patients References 1. Hadley MN, Sonntag VKH, Rekate HL, Murphy A. The infant whiplashshake injury syndrome: a clinical and pathological study . Neurosurgery . 1989; 24:536-540.Crossref 2. Caffey J. The whiplash shaken infant syndrome: manual shaking by the extremities with whiplash-induced intracranial and intraocular bleedings, linked with residual permanent brain damage and mental retardation . Pediatrics . 1974;54:396-403. 3. Wilkinson WS, Han DP, Rappley MD, Owings CL. Retinal hemorrhage predicts neurologic injury in the shaken baby syndrome . Arch Ophthalmol . 1989; 107:1472-1474.Crossref 4. Alexander R, Sato Y, Smith W, Bennett T. Incidence of impact trauma with cranial injuries ascribed to shaking . AJDC . 1990;144:724-726. 5. Dykes LJ. The whiplash shaken infant syndrome: what has been learned? Child Abuse Negl . 1986;10:211-221.Crossref 6. Brenner SL, Fischer H, Mann-Gray S. Race and the shaken baby syndrome: experience at one hospital . J Natl Med Assoc . 1989;81:183-184. 7. Prier R, Gulley M. A comparison of rates of child abuse in US Army families stationed in Europe and the United States . Mil Med . 1987;152:437-440. 8. Brown F, in cooperation with the American Hospital Association. ICD-9-CM Coding Handbook, With Answers, Revised Edition . Chicago, Ill: American Hospital Publishing Inc; 1989. 9. Dean J, Dean A, Burton A, Dicker R. EPI INFO Version 5 . Atlanta, Ga: Centers for Disease Control; 1990. 10. Duhaime A, Gennarelli TA, Thibault LE, Bruce DA, Margulies SS, Wiser R. The shaken baby syndrome: a clinical, pathological, and biomechanical study . J Neurosurg . 1987;66:409-415.Crossref 11. Levitt C, Smith, W, Alexander R. Abusive head trauma . In: Reece R, ed. Child Abuse: Medical Diagnosis and Management . Philadelphia, Pa: Lea & Febiger; 1994. 12. Crawford S, Fiedler E. Childhood physical and sexual abuse and failure to complete military basic training . Mil Med . 1992;157:645-648. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170160121024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Several recent studies1-5 have focused on the pathophysiological features, diagnostic procedures, and criteria of the shaken baby syndrome. Brenner et al6 noted that demographic information on shaken infants and their families is scarce. We were impressed with the seemingly large proportion of children of military families (military dependents) in the population of shaken infants seen at our hospital. Limited prior research has produced divergent conclusions as to whether military dependents are at higher risk of child maltreatment.7 The purpose of our study was to investigate whether military dependents were overrepresented among children hospitalized with shaken baby syndrome and if their pattern of injury or outcomes differed from those of children in the civilian population. Methods. We reviewed the charts of all infants with a diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome between January 1, 1989, and February 28, 1993, at the University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill. Patients References 1. Hadley MN, Sonntag VKH, Rekate HL, Murphy A. The infant whiplashshake injury syndrome: a clinical and pathological study . Neurosurgery . 1989; 24:536-540.Crossref 2. Caffey J. The whiplash shaken infant syndrome: manual shaking by the extremities with whiplash-induced intracranial and intraocular bleedings, linked with residual permanent brain damage and mental retardation . Pediatrics . 1974;54:396-403. 3. Wilkinson WS, Han DP, Rappley MD, Owings CL. Retinal hemorrhage predicts neurologic injury in the shaken baby syndrome . Arch Ophthalmol . 1989; 107:1472-1474.Crossref 4. Alexander R, Sato Y, Smith W, Bennett T. Incidence of impact trauma with cranial injuries ascribed to shaking . AJDC . 1990;144:724-726. 5. Dykes LJ. The whiplash shaken infant syndrome: what has been learned? Child Abuse Negl . 1986;10:211-221.Crossref 6. Brenner SL, Fischer H, Mann-Gray S. Race and the shaken baby syndrome: experience at one hospital . J Natl Med Assoc . 1989;81:183-184. 7. Prier R, Gulley M. A comparison of rates of child abuse in US Army families stationed in Europe and the United States . Mil Med . 1987;152:437-440. 8. Brown F, in cooperation with the American Hospital Association. ICD-9-CM Coding Handbook, With Answers, Revised Edition . Chicago, Ill: American Hospital Publishing Inc; 1989. 9. Dean J, Dean A, Burton A, Dicker R. EPI INFO Version 5 . Atlanta, Ga: Centers for Disease Control; 1990. 10. Duhaime A, Gennarelli TA, Thibault LE, Bruce DA, Margulies SS, Wiser R. The shaken baby syndrome: a clinical, pathological, and biomechanical study . J Neurosurg . 1987;66:409-415.Crossref 11. Levitt C, Smith, W, Alexander R. Abusive head trauma . In: Reece R, ed. Child Abuse: Medical Diagnosis and Management . Philadelphia, Pa: Lea & Febiger; 1994. 12. Crawford S, Fiedler E. Childhood physical and sexual abuse and failure to complete military basic training . Mil Med . 1992;157:645-648.

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1995

References