Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The Richest Monetary Prize in Vision

The Richest Monetary Prize in Vision EDITORIAL HOSE SEEKING BREAKTHROUGH DISCOVER- nal cells, which generate neural signals that are sent to ies in ophthalmology and vision, like those the brain. In 2010, it was awarded to J. Anthony Movshon working to bring the benefits of such dis- and William Newsome, for their elucidation of the ways coveries and modern ophthalmic care to in which the brain’s networks convert these light- T poor people around the globe, are not do- induced signals into discernible patterns that we call “vi- ing it for the recognition or the money. Still, recogni- sion.” And on September 14, 2012, the Vision Award was tion and monetary awards, particularly those that given to 2 groups of investigators, not for advances in advance their work, do not hurt. The Anto ´nio Cham- understanding how the eye visualizes the world, but for palimaud Vision Award, which is given annually, brings the development of novel approaches to better visualize both recognition and funding to research and practice. the inner structures of the eye. David Williams was rec- At €1 million ($1.32 million at recent exchange rates), ognized for his use of “adaptive optics” to visualize reti- it is also among the “richest” prizes in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Richest Monetary Prize in Vision

JAMA Ophthalmology , Volume 131 (5) – May 1, 2013

The Richest Monetary Prize in Vision

Abstract

EDITORIAL HOSE SEEKING BREAKTHROUGH DISCOVER- nal cells, which generate neural signals that are sent to ies in ophthalmology and vision, like those the brain. In 2010, it was awarded to J. Anthony Movshon working to bring the benefits of such dis- and William Newsome, for their elucidation of the ways coveries and modern ophthalmic care to in which the brain’s networks convert these light- T poor people around the globe, are not do- induced signals into discernible patterns that we call...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-richest-monetary-prize-in-vision-h6XekROwR7
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.1591
pmid
23699843
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL HOSE SEEKING BREAKTHROUGH DISCOVER- nal cells, which generate neural signals that are sent to ies in ophthalmology and vision, like those the brain. In 2010, it was awarded to J. Anthony Movshon working to bring the benefits of such dis- and William Newsome, for their elucidation of the ways coveries and modern ophthalmic care to in which the brain’s networks convert these light- T poor people around the globe, are not do- induced signals into discernible patterns that we call “vi- ing it for the recognition or the money. Still, recogni- sion.” And on September 14, 2012, the Vision Award was tion and monetary awards, particularly those that given to 2 groups of investigators, not for advances in advance their work, do not hurt. The Anto ´nio Cham- understanding how the eye visualizes the world, but for palimaud Vision Award, which is given annually, brings the development of novel approaches to better visualize both recognition and funding to research and practice. the inner structures of the eye. David Williams was rec- At €1 million ($1.32 million at recent exchange rates), ognized for his use of “adaptive optics” to visualize reti- it is also among the “richest” prizes in

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month