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The Rewards of Reducing Risk

The Rewards of Reducing Risk EDITORIAL HIS ISSUE PROVIDES A VERITABLE INTERNA- From these and other studies, it is apparent that to prop- tional smorgasbord of high-quality inves- erly care for the whole child, the presence of 1 health risk tigations into the prevalence, burdens, risk behavior (eg, depression) should prompt the assess- and protective factors, and outcomes of ment and management of other “fellow travelers,” such T children and adolescents with psychoso- as engaging in unprotected sex, not using a seat belt, to- cial difficulties. The bad news is that these problems are bacco and substance abuse, and lack of physical activ- pervasive, persistent, and interrelated. The good news is ity. In addition, given the intercorrelation of these di- that we have some clues about how to better detect, pre- verse behaviors, it is likely that there are some common vent, and treat some of these conditions. Let’s look a little protective and risk factors that might lead to prevention closer at what these articles are trying to teach us. or amelioration of many of these difficulties. In fact, data 17-19 The first broad issue is that these conditions are com- from the Add Health study suggest that parent- mon. Bullying, depression, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

The Rewards of Reducing Risk

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 158 (8) – Aug 1, 2004

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2004 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.158.8.824
pmid
15289258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL HIS ISSUE PROVIDES A VERITABLE INTERNA- From these and other studies, it is apparent that to prop- tional smorgasbord of high-quality inves- erly care for the whole child, the presence of 1 health risk tigations into the prevalence, burdens, risk behavior (eg, depression) should prompt the assess- and protective factors, and outcomes of ment and management of other “fellow travelers,” such T children and adolescents with psychoso- as engaging in unprotected sex, not using a seat belt, to- cial difficulties. The bad news is that these problems are bacco and substance abuse, and lack of physical activ- pervasive, persistent, and interrelated. The good news is ity. In addition, given the intercorrelation of these di- that we have some clues about how to better detect, pre- verse behaviors, it is likely that there are some common vent, and treat some of these conditions. Let’s look a little protective and risk factors that might lead to prevention closer at what these articles are trying to teach us. or amelioration of many of these difficulties. In fact, data 17-19 The first broad issue is that these conditions are com- from the Add Health study suggest that parent- mon. Bullying, depression, and

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 2004

References