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THE RESPIRATORY METABOLISM IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD

THE RESPIRATORY METABOLISM IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD In a recent communication,1 the view was expressed that the changed level of the basal metabolism in the marasmic infant is ascribable entirely to the relatively high content of active metabolic tissue in its organism coincident with the failure to lay down body fat. The basal rate was shown to be essentially the same per kilogram of active protoplasm in the emaciated as in the well nourished infant. In addition, previously reported studies2 did not give evidence of derangement of the intermediary carbohydrate metabolism in marasmus. Emaciated infants metabolized approximately the same proportion of ingested dextrose per kilogram of active protoplasm, in the three to four hours following a meal rich in dextrose, as normal control infants. The possibility remained that an abnormal response to the ingestion of food might lead to an excessive "cost of digestion" and thus play a rôle in the causation of marasmus. If http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE RESPIRATORY METABOLISM IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1928 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920280091008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a recent communication,1 the view was expressed that the changed level of the basal metabolism in the marasmic infant is ascribable entirely to the relatively high content of active metabolic tissue in its organism coincident with the failure to lay down body fat. The basal rate was shown to be essentially the same per kilogram of active protoplasm in the emaciated as in the well nourished infant. In addition, previously reported studies2 did not give evidence of derangement of the intermediary carbohydrate metabolism in marasmus. Emaciated infants metabolized approximately the same proportion of ingested dextrose per kilogram of active protoplasm, in the three to four hours following a meal rich in dextrose, as normal control infants. The possibility remained that an abnormal response to the ingestion of food might lead to an excessive "cost of digestion" and thus play a rôle in the causation of marasmus. If

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1928

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