Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

THE RED-LIGHT TREATMENT OF SMALLPOX.

THE RED-LIGHT TREATMENT OF SMALLPOX. In 1893 Finsen came forward with the proposition to place smallpox patients in rooms from which the chemical rays of light are rigidly excluded by means of red glass, red curtains, etc. He claimed that if the patient during the appearance and the growth of the exanthem is protected from the chemical rays, then the exanthem will be less pronounced than otherwise and suppuration with its attendant dangers largely avoided. This is Finsen's red-light treatment of smallpox. Without entering into any discussion of the physics of light involved in the method, let it suffice to say that Finsen was led to advocate the treatment from the following considerations: Chemical rays are irritating to normal skin, and hence, in all probability, they serve to increase the inflammatory processes set up in the skin in the course of variola. He presented considerable evidence from various sources that tends strongly to show that, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE RED-LIGHT TREATMENT OF SMALLPOX.

JAMA , Volume XLIV (6) – Feb 11, 1905

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-red-light-treatment-of-smallpox-9o0t2uecFt
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02500330045004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1893 Finsen came forward with the proposition to place smallpox patients in rooms from which the chemical rays of light are rigidly excluded by means of red glass, red curtains, etc. He claimed that if the patient during the appearance and the growth of the exanthem is protected from the chemical rays, then the exanthem will be less pronounced than otherwise and suppuration with its attendant dangers largely avoided. This is Finsen's red-light treatment of smallpox. Without entering into any discussion of the physics of light involved in the method, let it suffice to say that Finsen was led to advocate the treatment from the following considerations: Chemical rays are irritating to normal skin, and hence, in all probability, they serve to increase the inflammatory processes set up in the skin in the course of variola. He presented considerable evidence from various sources that tends strongly to show that,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 11, 1905

There are no references for this article.