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THE RATE OF SEDIMENTATION OF THE ERYTHROCYTES IN RHEUMATIC INFECTION IN CHILDREN

THE RATE OF SEDIMENTATION OF THE ERYTHROCYTES IN RHEUMATIC INFECTION IN CHILDREN Observations regarding the rate of sedimentation of the erythrocytes are sufficiently ancient to lend dignity and interest to the problem offered by the variation of this rate in rheumatic infection in children. Galen1 recorded that in certain conditions, particularly in severe infections, blood rapidly settled out, leaving a clear yellow serum. Several other clinicians made similar comments during the period when "blood letting" was popular. These observations were not crystallized into a test of value until 1897, when Bienacki2 proposed a method of measuring the speed with which red cells were separated from the plasma. There have been numerous modifications of his method, and the names of Fahraeus, Westergren and Linzenmeier are familiar in the literature on the subject. The basis of all the tests suggested is the time required for the erythrocytes to settle out of their suspension in the plasma. Fahraeus explained the change in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE RATE OF SEDIMENTATION OF THE ERYTHROCYTES IN RHEUMATIC INFECTION IN CHILDREN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.04140050049005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Observations regarding the rate of sedimentation of the erythrocytes are sufficiently ancient to lend dignity and interest to the problem offered by the variation of this rate in rheumatic infection in children. Galen1 recorded that in certain conditions, particularly in severe infections, blood rapidly settled out, leaving a clear yellow serum. Several other clinicians made similar comments during the period when "blood letting" was popular. These observations were not crystallized into a test of value until 1897, when Bienacki2 proposed a method of measuring the speed with which red cells were separated from the plasma. There have been numerous modifications of his method, and the names of Fahraeus, Westergren and Linzenmeier are familiar in the literature on the subject. The basis of all the tests suggested is the time required for the erythrocytes to settle out of their suspension in the plasma. Fahraeus explained the change in the

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1936

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