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The Proportion of Night Labors.

The Proportion of Night Labors. Davenport, Iowa, Oct. 14, 1905. To the Editor: —In The Journal of this date you refer to White, who considers the idea that a majority of labors terminate at night as probably fallacious and suggests a further consideration of statistics. In the Medical News, Sept. 12, 1891, Dr. G. W. H. Kemper recorded the statistics of 1,000 consecutive cases, 13 of which were twins, the hour of two births not recorded, leaving a total of 1,011 births. Dividing the day into six-hour periods beginning at midnight, there were in the first 291, in the second 267, in the third 222, and in the fourth 231 births, being an excess of 33 in favor of the night hours. Of the 250 consecutive labors of which I have kept notes 81 terminated in the first quarter of the day, 68 in the second, 43 in the third and 58 in the fourth, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Proportion of Night Labors.

JAMA , Volume XLV (17) – Oct 21, 1905

The Proportion of Night Labors.

Abstract


Davenport, Iowa, Oct. 14, 1905.

To the Editor:
—In The Journal of this date you refer to White, who considers the idea that a majority of labors terminate at night as probably fallacious and suggests a further consideration of statistics.
In the Medical News, Sept. 12, 1891, Dr. G. W. H. Kemper recorded the statistics of 1,000 consecutive cases, 13 of which were twins, the hour of two births not recorded, leaving a total of 1,011 births....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02510170053015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Davenport, Iowa, Oct. 14, 1905. To the Editor: —In The Journal of this date you refer to White, who considers the idea that a majority of labors terminate at night as probably fallacious and suggests a further consideration of statistics. In the Medical News, Sept. 12, 1891, Dr. G. W. H. Kemper recorded the statistics of 1,000 consecutive cases, 13 of which were twins, the hour of two births not recorded, leaving a total of 1,011 births. Dividing the day into six-hour periods beginning at midnight, there were in the first 291, in the second 267, in the third 222, and in the fourth 231 births, being an excess of 33 in favor of the night hours. Of the 250 consecutive labors of which I have kept notes 81 terminated in the first quarter of the day, 68 in the second, 43 in the third and 58 in the fourth,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 21, 1905

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