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The Prognostic Significance of Sound Recognition in Receptive Aphasia

The Prognostic Significance of Sound Recognition in Receptive Aphasia Abstract • Among 42 aphasics with notable to severe aural verbal comprehension defects in the acute stage of aphasia, 20 with normal sound recognition showed rapid and almost complete recovery of aural comprehension, regardless of how severely aural comprehension was initially impaired. Among 22 receptive aphasics with impaired sound recognition in the acute stage of aphasia, only 32% recovered rapidly; 45% had impairment two years after onset. Results indicated that intact sound recognition predicts rapid and complete recovery of aural comprehension. References 1. Spinnler H, Vignolo L: Impaired recognition of meaningful sounds in aphasia . Cortex 1966;2:337-348.Crossref 2. Faglioni P, Spinnler H, Vignolo L: Contrasting behavior of right and left hemisphere damaged patients on a discriminative and semantic task of auditory recognition . Cortex 1969;5:3-6, 389.Crossref 3. Vignolo L: Auditory agnosia , in Benton AL (ed): Contributions to Clinical Neuropsychology . Chicago, Aldine Publishing Co, 1969. 4. Varney NR: Sound recognition in relation to aural language comprehension in aphasic patients . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1980;43:71-75.Crossref 5. Spreen O, Benton AL: Sound Recognition Test . Iowa City, University of Iowa, 1974. 6. Benton AL, Hamsher K: Multilingual Aphasia Examination . Iowa City, University of Iowa, 1978. 7. Damasio AR, Damasio H, Rizzo M, et al: Aphasia with nonhemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia and internal capsule . Arch Neurol 1982;39:15-20.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

The Prognostic Significance of Sound Recognition in Receptive Aphasia

Archives of Neurology , Volume 41 (2) – Feb 1, 1984

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1984.04050140079030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Among 42 aphasics with notable to severe aural verbal comprehension defects in the acute stage of aphasia, 20 with normal sound recognition showed rapid and almost complete recovery of aural comprehension, regardless of how severely aural comprehension was initially impaired. Among 22 receptive aphasics with impaired sound recognition in the acute stage of aphasia, only 32% recovered rapidly; 45% had impairment two years after onset. Results indicated that intact sound recognition predicts rapid and complete recovery of aural comprehension. References 1. Spinnler H, Vignolo L: Impaired recognition of meaningful sounds in aphasia . Cortex 1966;2:337-348.Crossref 2. Faglioni P, Spinnler H, Vignolo L: Contrasting behavior of right and left hemisphere damaged patients on a discriminative and semantic task of auditory recognition . Cortex 1969;5:3-6, 389.Crossref 3. Vignolo L: Auditory agnosia , in Benton AL (ed): Contributions to Clinical Neuropsychology . Chicago, Aldine Publishing Co, 1969. 4. Varney NR: Sound recognition in relation to aural language comprehension in aphasic patients . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1980;43:71-75.Crossref 5. Spreen O, Benton AL: Sound Recognition Test . Iowa City, University of Iowa, 1974. 6. Benton AL, Hamsher K: Multilingual Aphasia Examination . Iowa City, University of Iowa, 1978. 7. Damasio AR, Damasio H, Rizzo M, et al: Aphasia with nonhemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia and internal capsule . Arch Neurol 1982;39:15-20.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1984

References