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The Principles of Public Health Engineering.

The Principles of Public Health Engineering. This book is prepared for two classes of students—the health officer who has had little or no engineering training, and the sanitary engineer with little or no knowledge of public health principles. In it are treated such topics as lighting, water supply and sewerage, atmospheric pollution, ventilation of buildings, and pasteurization of milk. The book is compact; the style, clear and concise. The proof-reading might be better, one important error being that on page 142, where aerobic is used for anaerobic. On page 158 "steam" is used in place of stream. There is occasionally a tendency to pedantry, as when "phreatic" water is used as synonymous with ground water. The discussion of air conditioning, including the control of atmospheric pollution, is particularly clear and outspoken. The author declares that "artificial humidification offers no particular advantages in the first place and, as practiced by the evaporation of water in the room http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Principles of Public Health Engineering.

JAMA , Volume 85 (20) – Nov 14, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02670200058033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This book is prepared for two classes of students—the health officer who has had little or no engineering training, and the sanitary engineer with little or no knowledge of public health principles. In it are treated such topics as lighting, water supply and sewerage, atmospheric pollution, ventilation of buildings, and pasteurization of milk. The book is compact; the style, clear and concise. The proof-reading might be better, one important error being that on page 142, where aerobic is used for anaerobic. On page 158 "steam" is used in place of stream. There is occasionally a tendency to pedantry, as when "phreatic" water is used as synonymous with ground water. The discussion of air conditioning, including the control of atmospheric pollution, is particularly clear and outspoken. The author declares that "artificial humidification offers no particular advantages in the first place and, as practiced by the evaporation of water in the room

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 14, 1925

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