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THE PRESENT STATUS OF OPERATIONS FOR CANCEROUS UTERI.

THE PRESENT STATUS OF OPERATIONS FOR CANCEROUS UTERI. We are one and all curious creatures of habit and victims of fancy. For example, if a little epidemic of smallpox claims a dozen victims or so, everybody is horror-sticken and large numbers of people are vaccinated as a precautionary measure. This is because smallpox is associated with a horrible disfiguring eruption. Thousands of victims die year by year of typhoid fever, in many of our large cities—notably in Philadelphia, through a long series of years—at a time in the world's history when it has long been shown that about one in a hundred thousand is what may be considered an average death-rate in well-regulated communities, and the most public interest that can be aroused is an occasional little spasmodic flutter in the newspapers. And this goes on indefinitely when every child knows that pure water will stop the disease, and when the pure water is within reach. The same http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE PRESENT STATUS OF OPERATIONS FOR CANCEROUS UTERI.

JAMA , Volume XXXIV (20) – May 19, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24610200001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We are one and all curious creatures of habit and victims of fancy. For example, if a little epidemic of smallpox claims a dozen victims or so, everybody is horror-sticken and large numbers of people are vaccinated as a precautionary measure. This is because smallpox is associated with a horrible disfiguring eruption. Thousands of victims die year by year of typhoid fever, in many of our large cities—notably in Philadelphia, through a long series of years—at a time in the world's history when it has long been shown that about one in a hundred thousand is what may be considered an average death-rate in well-regulated communities, and the most public interest that can be aroused is an occasional little spasmodic flutter in the newspapers. And this goes on indefinitely when every child knows that pure water will stop the disease, and when the pure water is within reach. The same

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 19, 1900

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