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The Practice of Nuclear Medicine

The Practice of Nuclear Medicine This work is divided into four parts which deal with physical principles underlying nuclear medicine, diagnostic methods involving the use of radioactive isotopes, therapeutic applications, and considerations of laboratory instrumentation and procedure. The first part contains instructive material that is likely to be new even to readers already familiar with the older literature of radiology. It includes a brief treatment of the intricate problems of dosimetry of the ionizing radiations. The second part begins with a detailed discussion of the use of iodine-131 in detecting abnormalities of form and function of the thyroid gland, and it continues with the various techniques used in localizing tumors, studying the gastrointestinal absorption of fats and proteins, testing the functions of liver and gallbladder, detecting gastrointestinal hemorrhage by means of erythrocytes labeled with chromium-51, and recognizing abnormalities of cardiovascular and renal function. Three chapters are devoted especially to determinations of blood volume, the diagnosis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Practice of Nuclear Medicine

JAMA , Volume 169 (2) – Jan 10, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03000190098024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This work is divided into four parts which deal with physical principles underlying nuclear medicine, diagnostic methods involving the use of radioactive isotopes, therapeutic applications, and considerations of laboratory instrumentation and procedure. The first part contains instructive material that is likely to be new even to readers already familiar with the older literature of radiology. It includes a brief treatment of the intricate problems of dosimetry of the ionizing radiations. The second part begins with a detailed discussion of the use of iodine-131 in detecting abnormalities of form and function of the thyroid gland, and it continues with the various techniques used in localizing tumors, studying the gastrointestinal absorption of fats and proteins, testing the functions of liver and gallbladder, detecting gastrointestinal hemorrhage by means of erythrocytes labeled with chromium-51, and recognizing abnormalities of cardiovascular and renal function. Three chapters are devoted especially to determinations of blood volume, the diagnosis

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 10, 1959

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