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The Position of the Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens

The Position of the Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens Abstract • Six human cadaver eyes were used for intraocular lens (Shearing) insertion, and the results were photographed. It was found that with the posterior capsule intact, insertion was relatively simple and the feet were found to lie in the ciliary body sulcus with good fixation. Some decentering was common and difficult to correct, but not optically important. With the posterior capsule torn or missing, misplacement was common. After correct insertion, the lens was well fixated without pseudophakodonesis, and there was still found to be room for an additional 1.5 to 2.0 mm of movement. References 1. Kaufman HE, Katz J, Valenti J, et al: Corneal endothelial damage with intraocular lenses: Contact adhesion between surgical materials and tissue . Science 198:525-527, 1977.Crossref 2. Forstot SL, Blackwell WL, Jaffe NS, et al: The effect of intraocular lens implantation on the corneal endothelium . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 83:195-203, 1977. 3. Jaffe NS, Eichenbaum DM, Clayman HM, et al: A comparison of 500 Binkhorst implants with 500 routine intracapsular cataract extractions . Am J Ophthalmol 85:24-27, 1978. 4. Katz J, Kaufman HE, Goldberg EP, et al: Prevention of endothelial damage from intraocular lens insertion . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 83:204-212, 1977. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Position of the Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1979.01020010367018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Six human cadaver eyes were used for intraocular lens (Shearing) insertion, and the results were photographed. It was found that with the posterior capsule intact, insertion was relatively simple and the feet were found to lie in the ciliary body sulcus with good fixation. Some decentering was common and difficult to correct, but not optically important. With the posterior capsule torn or missing, misplacement was common. After correct insertion, the lens was well fixated without pseudophakodonesis, and there was still found to be room for an additional 1.5 to 2.0 mm of movement. References 1. Kaufman HE, Katz J, Valenti J, et al: Corneal endothelial damage with intraocular lenses: Contact adhesion between surgical materials and tissue . Science 198:525-527, 1977.Crossref 2. Forstot SL, Blackwell WL, Jaffe NS, et al: The effect of intraocular lens implantation on the corneal endothelium . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 83:195-203, 1977. 3. Jaffe NS, Eichenbaum DM, Clayman HM, et al: A comparison of 500 Binkhorst implants with 500 routine intracapsular cataract extractions . Am J Ophthalmol 85:24-27, 1978. 4. Katz J, Kaufman HE, Goldberg EP, et al: Prevention of endothelial damage from intraocular lens insertion . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 83:204-212, 1977.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1979

References