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THE POLYMORPHONUCLEAR COUNT IN THE NEW-BORN

THE POLYMORPHONUCLEAR COUNT IN THE NEW-BORN During the study of the action of the ultraviolet light on the blood of the new-born infant, it was found that there was an increase in the white blood cells and a change in their morphology.1 It was therefore considered desirable to study this action in detail. METHOD This study is based on a series of 100 new-born infants, during a period of ten months. The differential counts were made within six hours after birth and at twenty-four hour intervals thereafter. The determinations were made at the same time every day. The slides were stained with carbol-pyronin,2 the films being dried in air and the stain applied for fifteen minutes. No preliminary fixation is required after washing and drying. The slides are examined unmounted. The stain imparts a deep blue color to the nuclei and a pink color to the cytoplasm. The red cells stain feebly pink. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE POLYMORPHONUCLEAR COUNT IN THE NEW-BORN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930090099012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the study of the action of the ultraviolet light on the blood of the new-born infant, it was found that there was an increase in the white blood cells and a change in their morphology.1 It was therefore considered desirable to study this action in detail. METHOD This study is based on a series of 100 new-born infants, during a period of ten months. The differential counts were made within six hours after birth and at twenty-four hour intervals thereafter. The determinations were made at the same time every day. The slides were stained with carbol-pyronin,2 the films being dried in air and the stain applied for fifteen minutes. No preliminary fixation is required after washing and drying. The slides are examined unmounted. The stain imparts a deep blue color to the nuclei and a pink color to the cytoplasm. The red cells stain feebly pink. In

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1929

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