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The Neurologic Content of Family Practice: Implications for Neurologists

The Neurologic Content of Family Practice: Implications for Neurologists Abstract Recent publications provide information and opinion on the nature and prevalence of neurologic disorders in the United States.1,2 Others address issues of neurologic manpower and the future oversupply or undersupply of neurologically competent physicians.3-5 A related question is addressed in this report: What neurologic problems come to family and general practitioners, those members of the medical community most frequently contacted for initial diagnosis and subsequent management or referral? Identification of the neurologic disorders frequently encountered in day-to-day family or general practice is useful to several groups, such as undergraduate medical curriculum planners and health professionals who determine training and certification requirements for generalists. The information is important to neurologists and administrators of neurologic training programs for several reasons. To merit referrals, neurologists must provide care of neurologic patients superior to that of generalists. The decision to seek neurologic consultation partially is determined by the generalist's perceptions of References 1. Kurtzke JF: The current neurological burden of illness and injury in the United States . Neurology 1982;32:1207-1215.Crossref 2. Murray TJ: Concepts in undergraduate neurological teaching . Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1976;79:275-284.Crossref 3. Dyken ML: The continuing undersupply of neurologists in the 1980s . Neurology 1982;32:651-656.Crossref 4. Martin JB: Whither neurology? N Engl J Med 1984;311:1048-1050.Crossref 5. Menken M, Sheps CG: Undergraduate education in the medical specialities: The case of neurology . N Engl J Med 1984;311:1045-1047.Crossref 6. Rose AS: Graduate training in neurology . Arch Neurol 1971;24:165-168.Crossref 7. National Disease and Therapeutic Index Speciality Profile: Neurologists. Ambler, Pa, IMS America Ltd, 1982. 8. Marsland DW, Wood M, Mayo F: The content of family practice . J Fam Pract 1976;3:23-74. 9. Menken M: The scope of neurologic practice . Arch Neurol 1985;42:386-387.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

The Neurologic Content of Family Practice: Implications for Neurologists

Archives of Neurology , Volume 43 (3) – Mar 1, 1986

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1986.00520030072021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Recent publications provide information and opinion on the nature and prevalence of neurologic disorders in the United States.1,2 Others address issues of neurologic manpower and the future oversupply or undersupply of neurologically competent physicians.3-5 A related question is addressed in this report: What neurologic problems come to family and general practitioners, those members of the medical community most frequently contacted for initial diagnosis and subsequent management or referral? Identification of the neurologic disorders frequently encountered in day-to-day family or general practice is useful to several groups, such as undergraduate medical curriculum planners and health professionals who determine training and certification requirements for generalists. The information is important to neurologists and administrators of neurologic training programs for several reasons. To merit referrals, neurologists must provide care of neurologic patients superior to that of generalists. The decision to seek neurologic consultation partially is determined by the generalist's perceptions of References 1. Kurtzke JF: The current neurological burden of illness and injury in the United States . Neurology 1982;32:1207-1215.Crossref 2. Murray TJ: Concepts in undergraduate neurological teaching . Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1976;79:275-284.Crossref 3. Dyken ML: The continuing undersupply of neurologists in the 1980s . Neurology 1982;32:651-656.Crossref 4. Martin JB: Whither neurology? N Engl J Med 1984;311:1048-1050.Crossref 5. Menken M, Sheps CG: Undergraduate education in the medical specialities: The case of neurology . N Engl J Med 1984;311:1045-1047.Crossref 6. Rose AS: Graduate training in neurology . Arch Neurol 1971;24:165-168.Crossref 7. National Disease and Therapeutic Index Speciality Profile: Neurologists. Ambler, Pa, IMS America Ltd, 1982. 8. Marsland DW, Wood M, Mayo F: The content of family practice . J Fam Pract 1976;3:23-74. 9. Menken M: The scope of neurologic practice . Arch Neurol 1985;42:386-387.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1986

References