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THE NECESSITY FOR INVESTIGATION AND OBSERVATION BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER.

THE NECESSITY FOR INVESTIGATION AND OBSERVATION BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER. Medicine is a science developed by a process of experimental induction, and by methods which lead to a complete, final evolution of undisputed facts. It is a rational science so far as the absolute conclusions, the uniform results, observable within its sphere, depend for their certainty upon comprehensive experience and complete analogy, and the reliable testimony of competent observers in the unalterable phenomena of nature. It is largely an empiric science inasmuch as the contingent methods generally accepted in the management of disease depend for their validity upon the cumulative evidence resulting from continued experimentation and observation. The institution of this method of investigation and observation formed the basis of its classification as a science. For several centuries subsequent to its origin to a certain stage of its development, medicine, however, presents nothing that is of scientific value, and little that is of interest save from an historic standpoint, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE NECESSITY FOR INVESTIGATION AND OBSERVATION BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER.

JAMA , Volume XXVIII (12) – Mar 20, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440120001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Medicine is a science developed by a process of experimental induction, and by methods which lead to a complete, final evolution of undisputed facts. It is a rational science so far as the absolute conclusions, the uniform results, observable within its sphere, depend for their certainty upon comprehensive experience and complete analogy, and the reliable testimony of competent observers in the unalterable phenomena of nature. It is largely an empiric science inasmuch as the contingent methods generally accepted in the management of disease depend for their validity upon the cumulative evidence resulting from continued experimentation and observation. The institution of this method of investigation and observation formed the basis of its classification as a science. For several centuries subsequent to its origin to a certain stage of its development, medicine, however, presents nothing that is of scientific value, and little that is of interest save from an historic standpoint, in

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 20, 1897

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