Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE NATURE OF THE PLANTAR REFLEX IN EARLY LIFE AND THE CAUSES OF ITS VARIATIONS

THE NATURE OF THE PLANTAR REFLEX IN EARLY LIFE AND THE CAUSES OF ITS VARIATIONS INTRODUCTORY AND HISTORICAL In 1898 Babinski1 called attention to the plantar reflex as a diagnostic sign in lesions of the pyramidal tracts of the spinal cord. The reflex which he called le phenoméne des orteils consists, as is now so well known, of the plantar flexion of the big toe consequent on the tickling of the inner border of the sole of the foot. This is the normal response. When the pyramidal tracts are diseased in any part of their course, the same stimulus applied to the sole of the foot results in a dorsiflexion instead of a plantar flexion of the toe. Since then this peculiarity of the toe reflex in organic lesions of the pyramidal tract has become known as Babinski's sign or the Babinski phenomenon, and has been a subject of investigation by many observers all over the world, including Buzzard,2 Collier,3 Cohn,4 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE NATURE OF THE PLANTAR REFLEX IN EARLY LIFE AND THE CAUSES OF ITS VARIATIONS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-nature-of-the-plantar-reflex-in-early-life-and-the-causes-of-its-Fro51nnHKT
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1922 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1922.01910370006001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTORY AND HISTORICAL In 1898 Babinski1 called attention to the plantar reflex as a diagnostic sign in lesions of the pyramidal tracts of the spinal cord. The reflex which he called le phenoméne des orteils consists, as is now so well known, of the plantar flexion of the big toe consequent on the tickling of the inner border of the sole of the foot. This is the normal response. When the pyramidal tracts are diseased in any part of their course, the same stimulus applied to the sole of the foot results in a dorsiflexion instead of a plantar flexion of the toe. Since then this peculiarity of the toe reflex in organic lesions of the pyramidal tract has become known as Babinski's sign or the Babinski phenomenon, and has been a subject of investigation by many observers all over the world, including Buzzard,2 Collier,3 Cohn,4

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1922

There are no references for this article.