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The Natural History of Teflon Catheter–Associated Phlebitis in Children

The Natural History of Teflon Catheter–Associated Phlebitis in Children Abstract • During a prospective evaluation of intravenous therapy with peripheral Teflon catheters in children, we found 30 episodes of phlebitis (10.4%). This rate is less than that reported in adults. Catheter colonization was not related to phlebitic episodes, and catheter-related infections did not occur. No patient's hospital course was prolonged because of phlebitis. Thirty percent of the episodes developed after the catheter was removed, and premonitory symptoms were not helpful in predicting the onset of phlebitis. Factors associated with an increased phlebitic risk were parenteral nutrition, administration of nafcillin sodium or aminoglycosides, and patient age. Parenteral nutrition prolonged the course of phlebitis. No factors hastened the onset of phlebitis. The duration of cannulation was not significantly related to phlebitis, suggesting that in some children the catheters can remain in place longer than 72 hours. Back to top Article Information Accepted for publication April 20, 1987. Presented in part at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Pediatric Research, Washington, DC, May 8, 1986. Reprint requests to Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, 1700 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (Dr Nelson). We acknowledge Teik-Ee Cheah, MBBS, Halim M. Hennes, MBBCh, and Tad M. Johnson, MD, for helping to collect the data; and Cynthi B. Garland for editing the manuscript. The authors have no proprietary interest in Teflon. References 1. Turnidge J. Hazards of peripheral intravenous lines . Med J Aust1984;141:37-40. PubMedGoogle Scholar 2. Peter G, Lloyde-Still JD, Lovejoy FH. Local infection and bacteremia from scalp-vein needles and polyethylene catheters in children . J Pediatr1972;80:78-83. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Maki DG, Goldmann DA, Rhame FS. Infection control in intravenous therapy . Ann Intern Med1973;79:867-887. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Maki DG, Drinka PJ, Davis TE. Suppurative phlebitis of an arm vein from a 'scalp vein' needle . N Engl J Med1975;292:1116-1117. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 5. Tully JL, Friedland GH, Baldini LM, et al. Complications of intravenous therapy with steel needles and Teflon catheters: A comparative study . Am J Med1981;70:702-706. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 6. Hershey CO, Tomford JW, McLaren CE, et al. The natural history of intravenous catheter–associated phlebitis . Arch Intern Med1984;144:1373-1375. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 7. Maki DG, Weise CE, Sarafin HW. A semiquantitative culture method for identifying intravenous catheter–related infection . N Engl J Med1977:296:1305-1309. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 8. Tomford JW, Hershey CO, McLaren CE, et al. Intravenous therapy team and peripheral venous catheter–associated complications: A prospective controlled study . Arch Intern Med1984;144:1191-1194. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 9. Friedland G. Infusion-related phlebitis: Is the in-line filter the solution? N Engl J Med1985;312:113-115. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 10. Lewis GBH, Hecker JF. Infusion thrombophlebitis . Br J Anaesth1985;57:220-233.Google ScholarCrossref 11. Rime B, Zufferey J, Bille J, et al. Clinical clues for peripherally inserted catheter removal rather than routine change . Read before the 26th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, New Orleans, Sept30 , 1986. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

The Natural History of Teflon Catheter–Associated Phlebitis in Children

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460100068028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • During a prospective evaluation of intravenous therapy with peripheral Teflon catheters in children, we found 30 episodes of phlebitis (10.4%). This rate is less than that reported in adults. Catheter colonization was not related to phlebitic episodes, and catheter-related infections did not occur. No patient's hospital course was prolonged because of phlebitis. Thirty percent of the episodes developed after the catheter was removed, and premonitory symptoms were not helpful in predicting the onset of phlebitis. Factors associated with an increased phlebitic risk were parenteral nutrition, administration of nafcillin sodium or aminoglycosides, and patient age. Parenteral nutrition prolonged the course of phlebitis. No factors hastened the onset of phlebitis. The duration of cannulation was not significantly related to phlebitis, suggesting that in some children the catheters can remain in place longer than 72 hours. Back to top Article Information Accepted for publication April 20, 1987. Presented in part at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Pediatric Research, Washington, DC, May 8, 1986. Reprint requests to Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, 1700 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (Dr Nelson). We acknowledge Teik-Ee Cheah, MBBS, Halim M. Hennes, MBBCh, and Tad M. Johnson, MD, for helping to collect the data; and Cynthi B. Garland for editing the manuscript. The authors have no proprietary interest in Teflon. References 1. Turnidge J. Hazards of peripheral intravenous lines . Med J Aust1984;141:37-40. PubMedGoogle Scholar 2. Peter G, Lloyde-Still JD, Lovejoy FH. Local infection and bacteremia from scalp-vein needles and polyethylene catheters in children . J Pediatr1972;80:78-83. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Maki DG, Goldmann DA, Rhame FS. Infection control in intravenous therapy . Ann Intern Med1973;79:867-887. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Maki DG, Drinka PJ, Davis TE. Suppurative phlebitis of an arm vein from a 'scalp vein' needle . N Engl J Med1975;292:1116-1117. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 5. Tully JL, Friedland GH, Baldini LM, et al. Complications of intravenous therapy with steel needles and Teflon catheters: A comparative study . Am J Med1981;70:702-706. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 6. Hershey CO, Tomford JW, McLaren CE, et al. The natural history of intravenous catheter–associated phlebitis . Arch Intern Med1984;144:1373-1375. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 7. Maki DG, Weise CE, Sarafin HW. A semiquantitative culture method for identifying intravenous catheter–related infection . N Engl J Med1977:296:1305-1309. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 8. Tomford JW, Hershey CO, McLaren CE, et al. Intravenous therapy team and peripheral venous catheter–associated complications: A prospective controlled study . Arch Intern Med1984;144:1191-1194. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 9. Friedland G. Infusion-related phlebitis: Is the in-line filter the solution? N Engl J Med1985;312:113-115. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 10. Lewis GBH, Hecker JF. Infusion thrombophlebitis . Br J Anaesth1985;57:220-233.Google ScholarCrossref 11. Rime B, Zufferey J, Bille J, et al. Clinical clues for peripherally inserted catheter removal rather than routine change . Read before the 26th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, New Orleans, Sept30 , 1986.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1987

Keywords: child,phlebitis,polytetrafluoroethylene,catheters,parenteral nutrition,catheterization,nafcillin,catheter-related infections,aminoglycosides,microbial colonization,prodrome

References

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