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The Natural History of Insomnia

The Natural History of Insomnia ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A Population-Based 3-Year Longitudinal Study Charles M. Morin, PhD; Lynda Be´langer, PhD; Me´lanie LeBlanc, PhD; Hans Ivers, PhD; Jose´e Savard, PhD; Colin A. Espie, PhD; Chantal Me´rette, PhD; Lucie Baillargeon, MD; Jean-Pierre Gre´goire, PhD Background: Despite its high prevalence, little infor- Results: Of the study sample, 74% reported insomnia mation is available about the natural history of insom- for at least 1 year (2 consecutive assessments) and 46% nia. The extent to which episodes of insomnia will per- reported insomnia persisting over the entire 3-year study. sist or remit over time is difficult to predict. We examined The course of insomnia was more likely to be persistent the natural history of insomnia and describe the most com- in those with more severe insomnia at baseline (ie, in- mon trajectories over 3 years. somnia syndrome) and in women and older adults. Re- mission rate was 54%; however, 27% of those with re- Methods: Three hundred eighty-eight adults (mean [SD] mission of insomnia eventually experienced relapse. age, 44.8 [13.9] years; 61% women) were selected from Individuals with subsyndromal insomnia at baseline were a larger population-based sample on the basis of the pres- 3 times more likely to remit than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2008.610
pmid
19273774
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION A Population-Based 3-Year Longitudinal Study Charles M. Morin, PhD; Lynda Be´langer, PhD; Me´lanie LeBlanc, PhD; Hans Ivers, PhD; Jose´e Savard, PhD; Colin A. Espie, PhD; Chantal Me´rette, PhD; Lucie Baillargeon, MD; Jean-Pierre Gre´goire, PhD Background: Despite its high prevalence, little infor- Results: Of the study sample, 74% reported insomnia mation is available about the natural history of insom- for at least 1 year (2 consecutive assessments) and 46% nia. The extent to which episodes of insomnia will per- reported insomnia persisting over the entire 3-year study. sist or remit over time is difficult to predict. We examined The course of insomnia was more likely to be persistent the natural history of insomnia and describe the most com- in those with more severe insomnia at baseline (ie, in- mon trajectories over 3 years. somnia syndrome) and in women and older adults. Re- mission rate was 54%; however, 27% of those with re- Methods: Three hundred eighty-eight adults (mean [SD] mission of insomnia eventually experienced relapse. age, 44.8 [13.9] years; 61% women) were selected from Individuals with subsyndromal insomnia at baseline were a larger population-based sample on the basis of the pres- 3 times more likely to remit than

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 9, 2009

References