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The Message in the Silence—Reply

The Message in the Silence—Reply In reply I appreciate the comments of Dr Berman on my editorial, “Sustaining Optimism.”1 I agree that Medicaid has many problems. However, it does provide insurance coverage for 17 million children in the United States, in contrast to the 9 million children without insurance. Universal coverage, even with Medicaid, is still far off and an improved system of coverage even farther. Right now, it is what we have to work with. Dr Austein also underscores the bureaucratic problems we all encounter dealing with Medicaid as an insurer. Whether we would be better off with a European-style system of universal coverage I have no idea, but I do think that Medicaid is better than no insurance for children in the United States. The quality of patient care in institutions serving a sizeable proportion of Medicaid patients must be high; I agree we cannot set a standard that is suboptimal. We all know that it is not easy being a physician in the United States right now, but it is still a wonderful profession and one that we need to ensure maintains the moral and ethical nature that inspired us to become physicians in the first place. Correspondence: Dr Rivara, Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, The Child Health Institute, University of Washington, 6200 NE 74th St, Suite 210, Seattle, WA 98115-8160 (fpr@u.washington.edu). References 1. Rivara FP Sustaining optimism. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004;158414- 415PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

The Message in the Silence—Reply

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.158.11.1091-a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In reply I appreciate the comments of Dr Berman on my editorial, “Sustaining Optimism.”1 I agree that Medicaid has many problems. However, it does provide insurance coverage for 17 million children in the United States, in contrast to the 9 million children without insurance. Universal coverage, even with Medicaid, is still far off and an improved system of coverage even farther. Right now, it is what we have to work with. Dr Austein also underscores the bureaucratic problems we all encounter dealing with Medicaid as an insurer. Whether we would be better off with a European-style system of universal coverage I have no idea, but I do think that Medicaid is better than no insurance for children in the United States. The quality of patient care in institutions serving a sizeable proportion of Medicaid patients must be high; I agree we cannot set a standard that is suboptimal. We all know that it is not easy being a physician in the United States right now, but it is still a wonderful profession and one that we need to ensure maintains the moral and ethical nature that inspired us to become physicians in the first place. Correspondence: Dr Rivara, Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, The Child Health Institute, University of Washington, 6200 NE 74th St, Suite 210, Seattle, WA 98115-8160 (fpr@u.washington.edu). References 1. Rivara FP Sustaining optimism. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004;158414- 415PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 2004

Keywords: child,insurance,medicaid,universal health insurance,pediatrics,positive attitude,Adolescent Medicine,ethics,child health,insurance carriers,insurance coverage

References