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The Medicalization of Common Conditions

The Medicalization of Common Conditions Letters is likely that progression to type 2 diabetes will be slower with Shahraz et al elegantly demonstrate how common condi- the expanded criteria compared with impaired glucose toler- tions can be “medicalized.” Using NHANES data they find that ance. Finally, medicalization of prediabetes may have the a widely promoted web-based risk test would label more than unintended consequence of reducing health care access to 73 million Americans, including more than 80% of those older patients with type 2 diabetes and other chronic conditions. than 60 years, as being at high risk for “prediabetes,” a condi- A valid method to examine for prediabetes should avoid un- tion never heard of 10 years ago. We suggest a better ap- necessary medicalization by labeling a disease predecessor as proach to preventing the epidemic of obesity and its multiple a medical condition and seek to concentrate on people at high- health-related complications is emphasis on healthful diet, est risk to allow for efficient distribution of limited health care weight loss when appropriate, and increased physical activ- resources. ity at all levels—by schools, the medical profession, and pub- lic health and governmental agencies. Saeid Shahraz, MD, PhD Anastassios G. Pittas, MD Rita F. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The Medicalization of Common Conditions

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 176 (12) – Dec 3, 2016

The Medicalization of Common Conditions

Abstract

Letters is likely that progression to type 2 diabetes will be slower with Shahraz et al elegantly demonstrate how common condi- the expanded criteria compared with impaired glucose toler- tions can be “medicalized.” Using NHANES data they find that ance. Finally, medicalization of prediabetes may have the a widely promoted web-based risk test would label more than unintended consequence of reducing health care access to 73 million Americans, including more than 80% of those older...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6210
pmid
27695854
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters is likely that progression to type 2 diabetes will be slower with Shahraz et al elegantly demonstrate how common condi- the expanded criteria compared with impaired glucose toler- tions can be “medicalized.” Using NHANES data they find that ance. Finally, medicalization of prediabetes may have the a widely promoted web-based risk test would label more than unintended consequence of reducing health care access to 73 million Americans, including more than 80% of those older patients with type 2 diabetes and other chronic conditions. than 60 years, as being at high risk for “prediabetes,” a condi- A valid method to examine for prediabetes should avoid un- tion never heard of 10 years ago. We suggest a better ap- necessary medicalization by labeling a disease predecessor as proach to preventing the epidemic of obesity and its multiple a medical condition and seek to concentrate on people at high- health-related complications is emphasis on healthful diet, est risk to allow for efficient distribution of limited health care weight loss when appropriate, and increased physical activ- resources. ity at all levels—by schools, the medical profession, and pub- lic health and governmental agencies. Saeid Shahraz, MD, PhD Anastassios G. Pittas, MD Rita F.

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 3, 2016

References

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