Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE LIMITATION OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY.

THE LIMITATION OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY. In the discussion of the operative procedure of epilepsy, one very important fact has failed to command the attention it deserves. Because an epileptic seizure is localized in its onset and course, it by no means argues that the epileptic lesion is a gross one or one to be benefited by operative procedure. We may have non-traumatic partial epilepsy, or what has been described by Fere as parcellar epilepsy or monospasm. These partial epilepsies may, and generally do, tally with grand mal fits in all other respects aside from their peculiar muscular spasm. Again, because the epileptic fit has a leisurely and well-marked order of invasion in the convulsion, it does not necessarily prove that a focal disease is at the beginning of the fit. Many grand mal epileptics, apparently idiopathics, come to autopsy with no visible local cause for this systematic order of invasion. Even various forms of localized http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE LIMITATION OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (21) – Nov 19, 1898

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-limitation-of-operative-treatment-of-epilepsy-4hLGjOWzpB
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.02450210053009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the discussion of the operative procedure of epilepsy, one very important fact has failed to command the attention it deserves. Because an epileptic seizure is localized in its onset and course, it by no means argues that the epileptic lesion is a gross one or one to be benefited by operative procedure. We may have non-traumatic partial epilepsy, or what has been described by Fere as parcellar epilepsy or monospasm. These partial epilepsies may, and generally do, tally with grand mal fits in all other respects aside from their peculiar muscular spasm. Again, because the epileptic fit has a leisurely and well-marked order of invasion in the convulsion, it does not necessarily prove that a focal disease is at the beginning of the fit. Many grand mal epileptics, apparently idiopathics, come to autopsy with no visible local cause for this systematic order of invasion. Even various forms of localized

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 19, 1898

There are no references for this article.