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THE LEGAL RESTRICTION OF MEDICAL PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES.

THE LEGAL RESTRICTION OF MEDICAL PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES. Gentlemen: In reviewing the subject of medical legislation, I am fully cognizant of encroachment of a subject most fertile in theory and suggestion, but quite devoid of illustrative beneficial results; a subject of vital importance to the public and profession, yet receiving but little aid and encouragement from either source in attempts at reforms. The history of medical legislation in this country shows, quite uniformly, that legislatures are quite apathetic when requested to enact laws regulating medical practice, and are most loth to believe that the best interests of the public are subserved by such laws, many even asserting their belief that all legislation of this character savors of trades unionism. In our attempts at medical reform, the demeanor of the profession has likewise been most discouraging. We concede to all the right of conservatism, but deem it the duty of all good citizens to pass conscientious judgment upon all http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE LEGAL RESTRICTION OF MEDICAL PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES.

JAMA , Volume XIII (14) – Oct 5, 1889

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1889 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1889.04440060002002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gentlemen: In reviewing the subject of medical legislation, I am fully cognizant of encroachment of a subject most fertile in theory and suggestion, but quite devoid of illustrative beneficial results; a subject of vital importance to the public and profession, yet receiving but little aid and encouragement from either source in attempts at reforms. The history of medical legislation in this country shows, quite uniformly, that legislatures are quite apathetic when requested to enact laws regulating medical practice, and are most loth to believe that the best interests of the public are subserved by such laws, many even asserting their belief that all legislation of this character savors of trades unionism. In our attempts at medical reform, the demeanor of the profession has likewise been most discouraging. We concede to all the right of conservatism, but deem it the duty of all good citizens to pass conscientious judgment upon all

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 5, 1889

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