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The Least of These My Brethren: A Doctor's Story of Hope and Miracles on an Inner-City AIDS Ward

The Least of These My Brethren: A Doctor's Story of Hope and Miracles on an Inner-City AIDS Ward As I read this memoir of a doctor's work on an AIDS ward in an inner-city Catholic hospital, I was reminded of a recent newspaper article about a 46-year-old physician who had given up his practice to become a Roman Catholic priest. When asked why, he replied that the spiritual needs of his patients required his attention more than their medical problems. Perhaps so. David Loxterkamp, a family physician in rural Maine, writes about a patient who came to his office to tell him, in the midst of a hectic day, about her unhappy childhood at the hand of an unloving mother. "Is there something you want from me, Mirabelle?" the doctor asked. "Why did you tell me this today?" "Because the priest is out of town and somebody needed to know," she answered.1 As its title suggests, Daniel Baxter's story invites comparison to the spiritual and medical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Least of These My Brethren: A Doctor's Story of Hope and Miracles on an Inner-City AIDS Ward

JAMA , Volume 278 (19) – Nov 19, 1997

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03550190099060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As I read this memoir of a doctor's work on an AIDS ward in an inner-city Catholic hospital, I was reminded of a recent newspaper article about a 46-year-old physician who had given up his practice to become a Roman Catholic priest. When asked why, he replied that the spiritual needs of his patients required his attention more than their medical problems. Perhaps so. David Loxterkamp, a family physician in rural Maine, writes about a patient who came to his office to tell him, in the midst of a hectic day, about her unhappy childhood at the hand of an unloving mother. "Is there something you want from me, Mirabelle?" the doctor asked. "Why did you tell me this today?" "Because the priest is out of town and somebody needed to know," she answered.1 As its title suggests, Daniel Baxter's story invites comparison to the spiritual and medical

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 19, 1997

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