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THE INTRADERMAL SALT SOLUTION TEST IN TUBERCULOSIS

THE INTRADERMAL SALT SOLUTION TEST IN TUBERCULOSIS Abstract In a recent publication, Feldman and Reifsneider1 briefly reviewed previous work with the intradermal salt solution test2 and reported results of its use in a series of cases of nephritis. McClure and Aldrich,3 who introduced the test in 1923, found that the elevation produced by the injection of salt solution disappeared more quickly than normally in the presence of edema or pre-edema. They 3 suggested the possibility that the rapid disappearance of the type studied in cases of edema with associated albuminuria might be due to a toxic condition of the tissues which increases their affinity for water. Results from the use of the test by Baker4 in scarlet fever, by Lash5 in toxemia of pregnancy, by Olmstead6 in a certain group of cardiac cases and by Harrison7 in pneumonia in children, tend to show a relationship between the toxicity or severity of illness of the patient and the disappearance References 1. Feldman, Aaron, and Reifsneider, J. S.: Arch. Int. Med. , 41:102 ( (Jan.) ) 1928.Crossref 2. The technic of the test is as follows: A small elevation is raised by the intracutaneous injection of 0.2 cc. of a sterile 0.8 per cent aqueous solution of sodium chloride. The length of time that the elevation remains palpable is noted. Normally, this time is at least one hour in children of more than 1 year of age, somewhat longer in white adults and still longer in negro adults. The tests reported here were performed mostly on the forearm, because, as has been pointed out by McClure and Aldrich, shortened time during which the elevation remains palpable due to deficient circulation is less frequently found here than in the leg. 3. McClure, W. B., and Aldrich, C. A.: Time Required for Disappearance of Intradermally Injected Salt Solutions , J. A. M. A. 81:293 ( (July 28) ) 1923Crossref 4. The Intradermal Salt Solution Test , J. A. M. A. 82:1425 ( (May 3) ) 1924.Crossref 5. Baker, W. J.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Scarlet Fever and Diphtheria Patients , J. A. M. A. 83:1566 ( (Nov. 15) ) 1924.Crossref 6. Lash, A. F.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Normal and Toxaemic Pregnancies; Diagnostic and Prognostic Aid , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 43:40 ( (July) ) 1926. 7. Olmsted, H. C.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Cardiac Diseases in Children , Arch. Int. Med. 37:281 ( (Feb.) ) 1926. 8. Harrison, J.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Lobar Pneumonia in Children , J. A. M. A. 84:1258 ( (April 25) ) 1925. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

THE INTRADERMAL SALT SOLUTION TEST IN TUBERCULOSIS

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 41 (4) – Apr 1, 1928

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1928 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0730-188X
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1928.00130160099006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In a recent publication, Feldman and Reifsneider1 briefly reviewed previous work with the intradermal salt solution test2 and reported results of its use in a series of cases of nephritis. McClure and Aldrich,3 who introduced the test in 1923, found that the elevation produced by the injection of salt solution disappeared more quickly than normally in the presence of edema or pre-edema. They 3 suggested the possibility that the rapid disappearance of the type studied in cases of edema with associated albuminuria might be due to a toxic condition of the tissues which increases their affinity for water. Results from the use of the test by Baker4 in scarlet fever, by Lash5 in toxemia of pregnancy, by Olmstead6 in a certain group of cardiac cases and by Harrison7 in pneumonia in children, tend to show a relationship between the toxicity or severity of illness of the patient and the disappearance References 1. Feldman, Aaron, and Reifsneider, J. S.: Arch. Int. Med. , 41:102 ( (Jan.) ) 1928.Crossref 2. The technic of the test is as follows: A small elevation is raised by the intracutaneous injection of 0.2 cc. of a sterile 0.8 per cent aqueous solution of sodium chloride. The length of time that the elevation remains palpable is noted. Normally, this time is at least one hour in children of more than 1 year of age, somewhat longer in white adults and still longer in negro adults. The tests reported here were performed mostly on the forearm, because, as has been pointed out by McClure and Aldrich, shortened time during which the elevation remains palpable due to deficient circulation is less frequently found here than in the leg. 3. McClure, W. B., and Aldrich, C. A.: Time Required for Disappearance of Intradermally Injected Salt Solutions , J. A. M. A. 81:293 ( (July 28) ) 1923Crossref 4. The Intradermal Salt Solution Test , J. A. M. A. 82:1425 ( (May 3) ) 1924.Crossref 5. Baker, W. J.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Scarlet Fever and Diphtheria Patients , J. A. M. A. 83:1566 ( (Nov. 15) ) 1924.Crossref 6. Lash, A. F.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Normal and Toxaemic Pregnancies; Diagnostic and Prognostic Aid , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 43:40 ( (July) ) 1926. 7. Olmsted, H. C.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Cardiac Diseases in Children , Arch. Int. Med. 37:281 ( (Feb.) ) 1926. 8. Harrison, J.: Intradermal Salt Solution Test in Lobar Pneumonia in Children , J. A. M. A. 84:1258 ( (April 25) ) 1925.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1928

References