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THE INORGANIC PHOSPHATE CONTENT OF BREAST MILK OF MOTHERS WITH NORMAL AND WITH RACHITIC INFANTS

THE INORGANIC PHOSPHATE CONTENT OF BREAST MILK OF MOTHERS WITH NORMAL AND WITH RACHITIC INFANTS The rôle of the phosphorus ion in the metabolism of rickets has recently acquired a prominence which is certain to be of the greatest moment. Clinically, we have learned form the work of Howland and Kramer1 that infantile rickets, when active, is invariably accompanied by a reduction in the serum inorganic phosphorus and, as shown by Hess and Gutman,2 this constituent of the blood rises as the rickets heals. Experimentally, the almost simultaneous and quite independent observations of Sherman and Pappenheimer3 and of McCollum and his associates4 have shown that rickets can be produced at will in the rat by a diet deficient in inorganic phosphorus, and that if this salt be added to the dietary in sufficient quantity, rickets fails to develop. However striking and conclusive these experimental observations may be, it is at once apparent that in the light of clinical experience they cannot http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE INORGANIC PHOSPHATE CONTENT OF BREAST MILK OF MOTHERS WITH NORMAL AND WITH RACHITIC INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1922 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1922.04120090023004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The rôle of the phosphorus ion in the metabolism of rickets has recently acquired a prominence which is certain to be of the greatest moment. Clinically, we have learned form the work of Howland and Kramer1 that infantile rickets, when active, is invariably accompanied by a reduction in the serum inorganic phosphorus and, as shown by Hess and Gutman,2 this constituent of the blood rises as the rickets heals. Experimentally, the almost simultaneous and quite independent observations of Sherman and Pappenheimer3 and of McCollum and his associates4 have shown that rickets can be produced at will in the rat by a diet deficient in inorganic phosphorus, and that if this salt be added to the dietary in sufficient quantity, rickets fails to develop. However striking and conclusive these experimental observations may be, it is at once apparent that in the light of clinical experience they cannot

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1922

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