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THE INFLUENCE OF FEEDING ON CERTAIN ACIDS IN THE FECES OF INFANTS

THE INFLUENCE OF FEEDING ON CERTAIN ACIDS IN THE FECES OF INFANTS In a number of recent publications1 my associates and I have reported the influence of various diets on the excretion of volatile, lactic and total titratable acid as well as on the hydrogen ion concentration in the feces of infants. We said little, however, regarding the significance of these chemical observations in respect to current theories of infant feeding. REVIEW OF THE CURRENT LITERATURE During the last two decades, the innumerable theories, clinical observations and experiments have seemed to coalesce into two schools. The first maintains that gastric or intestinal influences of some sort lead to diarrhea and nutritional disturbance. The second maintains that diarrhea is secondary and incidental to a primary disturbance in the general metabolism and nutrition. The first school is the more popular. While the mass of the literature is overwhelming and overlaps to a considerable extent, we have attempted to classify it as follows: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE INFLUENCE OF FEEDING ON CERTAIN ACIDS IN THE FECES OF INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940010038003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a number of recent publications1 my associates and I have reported the influence of various diets on the excretion of volatile, lactic and total titratable acid as well as on the hydrogen ion concentration in the feces of infants. We said little, however, regarding the significance of these chemical observations in respect to current theories of infant feeding. REVIEW OF THE CURRENT LITERATURE During the last two decades, the innumerable theories, clinical observations and experiments have seemed to coalesce into two schools. The first maintains that gastric or intestinal influences of some sort lead to diarrhea and nutritional disturbance. The second maintains that diarrhea is secondary and incidental to a primary disturbance in the general metabolism and nutrition. The first school is the more popular. While the mass of the literature is overwhelming and overlaps to a considerable extent, we have attempted to classify it as follows:

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1930

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