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The Importance of Six Common Bacteria in Intestinal Strangulation

The Importance of Six Common Bacteria in Intestinal Strangulation Abstract The effects of monocontamination by each of six common intestinal bacteria were studied in germ-free rats with ischemic or hemorrhagic strangulation of closed intestinal segments. Six groups of 30 germfree rats were monocontaminated, each group with a single strain of one of the microorganisms. We found that (a) Bacteroides fragilis, Streptococcus faecalis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus were innocuous; (b) Staphylococcus aureus 80/81 killed only 17% of the animals; (c) Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa killed over 90% of the animals within 36 hours after strangulation; and (d) monocontamination and operation without strangulation was well tolerated by most of the animals except those associated with Ps aeruginosa. We concluded that the common intestinal bacteria vary greatly in their ability to cause death after intestinal strangulation. References 1. Yale CE, Altemeier WA: Intestinal obstruction in germ-free rats . Arch Surg 91:241-247, 1965.Crossref 2. Yale CE, Balish E: Intestinal strangulation in Clostridium perfringens monocontaminated rats . Infec Immun 3:481-487, 1971. 3. Yale CE, Vivek AR: Intestinal strangulation in Escherichia coli monocontaminated gnotobiotic rats . Infec Immun 1:195-199, 1970. 4. Yale CE, Dowell VR Jr: Intestinal strangulation in rats monocontaminated with Sphaerophorus necrophorus . Surgery 67:478-483, 1970. 5. Donaldson RM Jr: Normal bacterial populations of the intestine and their relation to intestinal function . New Eng J Med 270:938-945, 994-1001, 1050-1056, 1964.Crossref 6. Nelson DP, Mata LJ: Bacterial flora associated with the human gastrointestinal mucosa . Gastroenterology 58:56-61, 1970. 7. Reed LJ, Muench H: A simple method of estimating fifty per cent endpoints . Amer J Hyg 27:493-497, 1938. 8. Yale CE: Ischemic intestinal strangulation in germ-free rats . Arch Surg 99:397-400, 1969.Crossref 9. Bornside GH, Dresden CF, Floyd CE, et al: Serial changes of intestinal contents in strangulation obstruction . JAMA 183:118-120, 1963.Crossref 10. Drasar BS, Shiner M: Studies on the intestinal flora: Part II. Bacterial flora of the small intestine in patients with gastrointestinal disorders . Gut 10:812-819, 1969.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

The Importance of Six Common Bacteria in Intestinal Strangulation

Archives of Surgery , Volume 104 (4) – Apr 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1972.04180040052009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The effects of monocontamination by each of six common intestinal bacteria were studied in germ-free rats with ischemic or hemorrhagic strangulation of closed intestinal segments. Six groups of 30 germfree rats were monocontaminated, each group with a single strain of one of the microorganisms. We found that (a) Bacteroides fragilis, Streptococcus faecalis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus were innocuous; (b) Staphylococcus aureus 80/81 killed only 17% of the animals; (c) Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa killed over 90% of the animals within 36 hours after strangulation; and (d) monocontamination and operation without strangulation was well tolerated by most of the animals except those associated with Ps aeruginosa. We concluded that the common intestinal bacteria vary greatly in their ability to cause death after intestinal strangulation. References 1. Yale CE, Altemeier WA: Intestinal obstruction in germ-free rats . Arch Surg 91:241-247, 1965.Crossref 2. Yale CE, Balish E: Intestinal strangulation in Clostridium perfringens monocontaminated rats . Infec Immun 3:481-487, 1971. 3. Yale CE, Vivek AR: Intestinal strangulation in Escherichia coli monocontaminated gnotobiotic rats . Infec Immun 1:195-199, 1970. 4. Yale CE, Dowell VR Jr: Intestinal strangulation in rats monocontaminated with Sphaerophorus necrophorus . Surgery 67:478-483, 1970. 5. Donaldson RM Jr: Normal bacterial populations of the intestine and their relation to intestinal function . New Eng J Med 270:938-945, 994-1001, 1050-1056, 1964.Crossref 6. Nelson DP, Mata LJ: Bacterial flora associated with the human gastrointestinal mucosa . Gastroenterology 58:56-61, 1970. 7. Reed LJ, Muench H: A simple method of estimating fifty per cent endpoints . Amer J Hyg 27:493-497, 1938. 8. Yale CE: Ischemic intestinal strangulation in germ-free rats . Arch Surg 99:397-400, 1969.Crossref 9. Bornside GH, Dresden CF, Floyd CE, et al: Serial changes of intestinal contents in strangulation obstruction . JAMA 183:118-120, 1963.Crossref 10. Drasar BS, Shiner M: Studies on the intestinal flora: Part II. Bacterial flora of the small intestine in patients with gastrointestinal disorders . Gut 10:812-819, 1969.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1972

References