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The HIV-Positive Health Professional: Policy Options for Individuals, Institutions, and States: Public Policy and the Public—Observations From the Front Line

The HIV-Positive Health Professional: Policy Options for Individuals, Institutions, and States:... This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract I was asked by Dr David Price to speak about the topic of assuring and calming a nervous public. The problem I was asked to address can be stated as follows: How can one develop a policy that (1) is scientifically rational; (2) protects the public; (3) protects the infected from discrimination; and (4) does not lead to undesirable derivative consequences, such as testing of all health care workers and patients. This charge is difficult in ordinary circumstances. The fear of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease from a health care provider makes the task all the more difficult. I have no answers to the question of "what should our policy be concerning HIV-infected health care workers?" I can only offer some observations and vignettes from policy debates of the past. They may provide useful guideposts for the current discussion. My observations are influenced by past experience with the acquired http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The HIV-Positive Health Professional: Policy Options for Individuals, Institutions, and States: Public Policy and the Public—Observations From the Front Line

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (4) – Apr 1, 1991

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400040009002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract I was asked by Dr David Price to speak about the topic of assuring and calming a nervous public. The problem I was asked to address can be stated as follows: How can one develop a policy that (1) is scientifically rational; (2) protects the public; (3) protects the infected from discrimination; and (4) does not lead to undesirable derivative consequences, such as testing of all health care workers and patients. This charge is difficult in ordinary circumstances. The fear of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease from a health care provider makes the task all the more difficult. I have no answers to the question of "what should our policy be concerning HIV-infected health care workers?" I can only offer some observations and vignettes from policy debates of the past. They may provide useful guideposts for the current discussion. My observations are influenced by past experience with the acquired

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1991

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