Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The History of Coronary Arterial Disease.

The History of Coronary Arterial Disease. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract This is the ideal time for detailed study of the evolution of our knowledge of the anatomical and clinical aspects of coronary arterial obstruction. The disease was rare until two centuries ago, and less than a century ago was rare among Americans dying in charity hospitals. In another century it may be as rare as tetanus or typhoid, but now is the "captain of the men of death" in prospering countries of Europe and North America. Leibowitz gives us an excellent account of the gradual evolution of our knowledge of the clinical features and anatomical finding in patients with coronary obstruction. Only a few paragraphs are devoted to etiology and treatment, areas which should be ready for the historian within another generation. This text, clearly written and modestly illustrated, deals with manuscripts and printed accounts of coronary patients, from the dawn of our profession in antiquity down to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The History of Coronary Arterial Disease.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 129 (6) – Jun 1, 1972

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-history-of-coronary-arterial-disease-Ac6b5tBd7X
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.00320060144024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract This is the ideal time for detailed study of the evolution of our knowledge of the anatomical and clinical aspects of coronary arterial obstruction. The disease was rare until two centuries ago, and less than a century ago was rare among Americans dying in charity hospitals. In another century it may be as rare as tetanus or typhoid, but now is the "captain of the men of death" in prospering countries of Europe and North America. Leibowitz gives us an excellent account of the gradual evolution of our knowledge of the clinical features and anatomical finding in patients with coronary obstruction. Only a few paragraphs are devoted to etiology and treatment, areas which should be ready for the historian within another generation. This text, clearly written and modestly illustrated, deals with manuscripts and printed accounts of coronary patients, from the dawn of our profession in antiquity down to the

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1972

There are no references for this article.