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The Growing Case for Routine Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes

The Growing Case for Routine Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes Opinion EDITORIAL The Growing Case for Routine Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes Paul A. Heidenreich, MD, MS The clinical history elicited during the patient visit is tradi- In this issue of JAMA Cardiology, Greene and colleagues tionally viewed as the most important source of medical show that this patient- vs clinician-reported outcome discrep- 1,2 3 information, particularly for patients with heart failure. As ancy extends to heart failure care. They included 2872 pa- medical students, we learned that although the patient is the tients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction across source of the data, the expert 145 practices participating in the CHAMP-HF Registry. The PRO clinician knows what is rel- was the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) Multimedia evant and how best to inte- overall summary score. The majority of patients were NYHA grate the patient’s informa- class II (59.5%) or class III (30.0%). At 12 months, most pa- Related article page 522 tion to determine diagnosis tients did not have an NYHA change (no change in clinician- and prognosis. reported outcome) whereas the most common trajectory for With the move toward patient-centered care came a greater the KCCQ score was a 10-point improvement. A 5-point im- interest http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Cardiology American Medical Association

The Growing Case for Routine Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes

JAMA Cardiology , Volume 6 (5) – May 24, 2021

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2380-6583
eISSN
2380-6591
DOI
10.1001/jamacardio.2021.0391
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL The Growing Case for Routine Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes Paul A. Heidenreich, MD, MS The clinical history elicited during the patient visit is tradi- In this issue of JAMA Cardiology, Greene and colleagues tionally viewed as the most important source of medical show that this patient- vs clinician-reported outcome discrep- 1,2 3 information, particularly for patients with heart failure. As ancy extends to heart failure care. They included 2872 pa- medical students, we learned that although the patient is the tients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction across source of the data, the expert 145 practices participating in the CHAMP-HF Registry. The PRO clinician knows what is rel- was the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) Multimedia evant and how best to inte- overall summary score. The majority of patients were NYHA grate the patient’s informa- class II (59.5%) or class III (30.0%). At 12 months, most pa- Related article page 522 tion to determine diagnosis tients did not have an NYHA change (no change in clinician- and prognosis. reported outcome) whereas the most common trajectory for With the move toward patient-centered care came a greater the KCCQ score was a 10-point improvement. A 5-point im- interest

Journal

JAMA CardiologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 24, 2021

References