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The Future of HIV Prevention in the United States

The Future of HIV Prevention in the United States VIEWPOINT The Future of HIV Prevention in the United States acquisition vary from 31% for an investigational vaccine to Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH 96% for ART for infected partners in an HIV-discordant re- Kevin A. Fenton, MD, PhD lationship. High Impact Prevention requires understand- ing the efficacy of interventions in preventing HIV acqui- N THE UNITED STATES, 1.1 MILLION PEOPLE LIVE WITH sition or transmission, assessing the effectiveness of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a 60% increase interventions in nontrial settings, establishing the cost per from 15 years ago. The increasing number of people who infection averted, determining the feasibility of full-scale Ican potentially transmit HIV makes prevention more dif- implementation in target populations, developing epi- ficult. Yet federal domestic HIV prevention funding, after demic models to project effectiveness, prioritizing among adjustment for inflation, has not increased since 1991, ne- interventions, and implementing and evaluating programs cessitating a different approach to HIV prevention. designed to maximize reductions in incidence. The CDC’s new strategy, “High Impact Prevention,” in- Optimizing utility requires thinking beyond efficacy and con- volves prioritizing and implementing the optimal combi- sidering economics and the extent to which goals are achieved nation of cost-effective, scalable interventions based on cur- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Future of HIV Prevention in the United States

JAMA , Volume 308 (4) – Jul 25, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.8693
pmid
22820785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINT The Future of HIV Prevention in the United States acquisition vary from 31% for an investigational vaccine to Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH 96% for ART for infected partners in an HIV-discordant re- Kevin A. Fenton, MD, PhD lationship. High Impact Prevention requires understand- ing the efficacy of interventions in preventing HIV acqui- N THE UNITED STATES, 1.1 MILLION PEOPLE LIVE WITH sition or transmission, assessing the effectiveness of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a 60% increase interventions in nontrial settings, establishing the cost per from 15 years ago. The increasing number of people who infection averted, determining the feasibility of full-scale Ican potentially transmit HIV makes prevention more dif- implementation in target populations, developing epi- ficult. Yet federal domestic HIV prevention funding, after demic models to project effectiveness, prioritizing among adjustment for inflation, has not increased since 1991, ne- interventions, and implementing and evaluating programs cessitating a different approach to HIV prevention. designed to maximize reductions in incidence. The CDC’s new strategy, “High Impact Prevention,” in- Optimizing utility requires thinking beyond efficacy and con- volves prioritizing and implementing the optimal combi- sidering economics and the extent to which goals are achieved nation of cost-effective, scalable interventions based on cur-

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 25, 2012

References