Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE FROM FATALITY.

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE... The frequency of apoplexy among the higher classes with suggestionsfor its prevention and escape from fatality. BY ELMER LEE, A.M., M.D., PH.B. It is rare that an animal dies of apoplexy, but man's days are frequently ended by this disease, coming upon him generally later than the age of 50. The contrast between the simple life of the animal and the complex one of the man is in favor of the former, so far as it relates to health. At the beginning, the young animal and the child are on the same natural footing, both are nature's sweet and innocent children. Little by little the child grows away from dependence upon natural methods for its guide, substituting the artificial as life advances and ever becomes more complex. . . . The beginning of disease is at that moment when the laws of health are first violated, and starts with infancy and childhood in the majority of cases. . . . . . . Familiarity with the titles and literature pertaining to alcoholic poisons, otherwise known in polite circles as "cocktails," "gin-slings," "brandy-smashes," "Tom and Jerry," and "nightcaps," together with a very long list of fantastic names supposed to represent some peculiar virtue, forsooth, that which is good for man, is early acquired by the youth who are to constitute later the apoplectic surprises which are noted in the daily morning paper, thereby forming a morsel for comment even by those who are in the same danger but heed it not. In natural health the ideal desire is to prolong life and to walk in pleasant paths. Every one hopes to escape pain and sickness, and of the many who so desire, a few only succeed. Nature is most gentle and tender, but at the same time absolutely just, and what is suffered by man is through either folly or ignorance in his blinded eagerness to attain the satisfaction of a bauble. . . . The number of fatalities from apoplexy would be even far greater if it were not that death claims many victims of wrong living ere the course of mistakes run by weak and deluded humanity reach the apoplectic goal. This is a frequent disease among the higher classes, for it is in this class that those excesses which contribute to produce apoplexy prevail to such a degree as to keep the press supplied with obituaries of those accounted distinguished and possessed of lovable characters. . . . So intense is the demand for artificial stimulation when once the natural appetite is perverted by thoughtless and innocent indulgences, later by fierce and uncontrolled intemperance in eating, drinking and sinning, in desecration of the holy temple of health, that life without these health-destroying agents seems to such characters a failure. The use of artificial and false doctrines poisons in gradual degree the whole race. The American teaches the child to prepare for fatty degeneration and its consequent choice collections of bodily afflictions, by setting examples that if followed, lead to destruction of health and loss of life. . . . By dressing the body with too much clothing, dangers to health are increased and recovery from chronic diseases retarded. As a plant would soon die without its trunk and branches freely exposed to air and light, so the human body dies gradually, though one of the causes is often overlooked or attributed to other explanations. The best light-weight underwear procurable in either silk, cotton or linen mesh for the youth and the adult, in health or sickness, is indicated both in winter and summer. Flannels are no longer recommended for scientific reasons. Then with a correct food supply and the use of pure water for the drink, freely taken all through life, together with right use of covering for the body, which will admit of enough ventilation (seldom found among my patients and the sick generally), with sound medical counsel, places it within the reach of the average individual to avoid a premature fatality. Open air exercise is indispensable to the preservation of health and to the prevention of apoplexy. The causes of sickness and disease are the causes of apoplexy and prevention and escape from fatality means that the individual can not violate natural laws of organization and vitality, with coarse jeer at health requirements. To the hourly and daily and non-compromising demands to practice wisdom, there is no appeal, and the penalty for violations of nature's code for man's use, is paid with a forfeit of his life. JAMA. 1898;30:1083-1084 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE FROM FATALITY.

JAMA , Volume 279 (16) – Apr 22, 1998

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE FROM FATALITY.

Abstract

The frequency of apoplexy among the higher classes with suggestionsfor its prevention and escape from fatality. BY ELMER LEE, A.M., M.D., PH.B. It is rare that an animal dies of apoplexy, but man's days are frequently ended by this disease, coming upon him generally later than the age of 50. The contrast between the simple life of the animal and the complex one of the man is in favor of the former, so far as it relates to health. At the beginning, the young animal and the child are on...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-frequency-of-apoplexy-among-the-higher-classes-with-suggestions-2Hm0rPRC9g
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.279.16.1312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The frequency of apoplexy among the higher classes with suggestionsfor its prevention and escape from fatality. BY ELMER LEE, A.M., M.D., PH.B. It is rare that an animal dies of apoplexy, but man's days are frequently ended by this disease, coming upon him generally later than the age of 50. The contrast between the simple life of the animal and the complex one of the man is in favor of the former, so far as it relates to health. At the beginning, the young animal and the child are on the same natural footing, both are nature's sweet and innocent children. Little by little the child grows away from dependence upon natural methods for its guide, substituting the artificial as life advances and ever becomes more complex. . . . The beginning of disease is at that moment when the laws of health are first violated, and starts with infancy and childhood in the majority of cases. . . . . . . Familiarity with the titles and literature pertaining to alcoholic poisons, otherwise known in polite circles as "cocktails," "gin-slings," "brandy-smashes," "Tom and Jerry," and "nightcaps," together with a very long list of fantastic names supposed to represent some peculiar virtue, forsooth, that which is good for man, is early acquired by the youth who are to constitute later the apoplectic surprises which are noted in the daily morning paper, thereby forming a morsel for comment even by those who are in the same danger but heed it not. In natural health the ideal desire is to prolong life and to walk in pleasant paths. Every one hopes to escape pain and sickness, and of the many who so desire, a few only succeed. Nature is most gentle and tender, but at the same time absolutely just, and what is suffered by man is through either folly or ignorance in his blinded eagerness to attain the satisfaction of a bauble. . . . The number of fatalities from apoplexy would be even far greater if it were not that death claims many victims of wrong living ere the course of mistakes run by weak and deluded humanity reach the apoplectic goal. This is a frequent disease among the higher classes, for it is in this class that those excesses which contribute to produce apoplexy prevail to such a degree as to keep the press supplied with obituaries of those accounted distinguished and possessed of lovable characters. . . . So intense is the demand for artificial stimulation when once the natural appetite is perverted by thoughtless and innocent indulgences, later by fierce and uncontrolled intemperance in eating, drinking and sinning, in desecration of the holy temple of health, that life without these health-destroying agents seems to such characters a failure. The use of artificial and false doctrines poisons in gradual degree the whole race. The American teaches the child to prepare for fatty degeneration and its consequent choice collections of bodily afflictions, by setting examples that if followed, lead to destruction of health and loss of life. . . . By dressing the body with too much clothing, dangers to health are increased and recovery from chronic diseases retarded. As a plant would soon die without its trunk and branches freely exposed to air and light, so the human body dies gradually, though one of the causes is often overlooked or attributed to other explanations. The best light-weight underwear procurable in either silk, cotton or linen mesh for the youth and the adult, in health or sickness, is indicated both in winter and summer. Flannels are no longer recommended for scientific reasons. Then with a correct food supply and the use of pure water for the drink, freely taken all through life, together with right use of covering for the body, which will admit of enough ventilation (seldom found among my patients and the sick generally), with sound medical counsel, places it within the reach of the average individual to avoid a premature fatality. Open air exercise is indispensable to the preservation of health and to the prevention of apoplexy. The causes of sickness and disease are the causes of apoplexy and prevention and escape from fatality means that the individual can not violate natural laws of organization and vitality, with coarse jeer at health requirements. To the hourly and daily and non-compromising demands to practice wisdom, there is no appeal, and the penalty for violations of nature's code for man's use, is paid with a forfeit of his life. JAMA. 1898;30:1083-1084

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 22, 1998

There are no references for this article.