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The Flexible Medical Residency

The Flexible Medical Residency Abstract Several years ago it appeared likely that health care provision in the United States would develop as Pellegrino1 suggested, with primary care being provided by the family practitioner (and his associates), and secondary and tertiary care by the general internist and the organsystem subspecialist, respectively. Consultative medicine appeared to become increasingly the domain of the organ-system subspecialist. This conceptual model for the role of the internist was reinforced on the undergraduate level by the process of tracking. On the postgraduate level, support for this model came from the abandonment of the internship, and the increase in subspecialty fellowship training at the expense of the time devoted to training in general internal medicine. However, it now appears that the internist of the future will provide a considerable portion of primary care in America. What practicing internists knew all along has now become common knowledge in the academic community as a References 1. Pellegrino ED: The identity crisis of an ideal , in Ingelfinger FJ, Ebert RV, Finland M, et al (eds): Controversy in Internal Medicine . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1974, pp 41-50. 2. Ebert RV: Training of the internist as a primary physician . Ann Intern Med 76:653-656, 1972.Crossref 3. Reitmeier RJ, Spittell JA, Weeks RE, et al: Participation of internists in primary care . Arch Intern Med 135:255-257, 1975.Crossref 4. Young LE: The broadly based internist as the backbone of medical practice , in Ingelfinger FJ, Ebert RV, Finland M, et al (eds): Controversy in Internal Medicine . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1974, pp 51-63. 5. Petersdorf RG: Internal medicine and family practice controversies, conflict and compromise . N Engl J Med 293:326-332, 1975.Crossref 6. Ingelfinger FJ: League for beleaguered internists . N Engl J Med 292:589-590, 1975.Crossref 7. Petersdorf RG: Health manpower: Numbers, distribution, quality . Ann Intern Med 82:694-701, 1975.Crossref 8. Burnum JF: What one internist does in his practice . Ann Intern Med 78:437-444, 1973.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The Flexible Medical Residency

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 137 (1) – Jan 1, 1977

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1977.03630130083019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Several years ago it appeared likely that health care provision in the United States would develop as Pellegrino1 suggested, with primary care being provided by the family practitioner (and his associates), and secondary and tertiary care by the general internist and the organsystem subspecialist, respectively. Consultative medicine appeared to become increasingly the domain of the organ-system subspecialist. This conceptual model for the role of the internist was reinforced on the undergraduate level by the process of tracking. On the postgraduate level, support for this model came from the abandonment of the internship, and the increase in subspecialty fellowship training at the expense of the time devoted to training in general internal medicine. However, it now appears that the internist of the future will provide a considerable portion of primary care in America. What practicing internists knew all along has now become common knowledge in the academic community as a References 1. Pellegrino ED: The identity crisis of an ideal , in Ingelfinger FJ, Ebert RV, Finland M, et al (eds): Controversy in Internal Medicine . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1974, pp 41-50. 2. Ebert RV: Training of the internist as a primary physician . Ann Intern Med 76:653-656, 1972.Crossref 3. Reitmeier RJ, Spittell JA, Weeks RE, et al: Participation of internists in primary care . Arch Intern Med 135:255-257, 1975.Crossref 4. Young LE: The broadly based internist as the backbone of medical practice , in Ingelfinger FJ, Ebert RV, Finland M, et al (eds): Controversy in Internal Medicine . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1974, pp 51-63. 5. Petersdorf RG: Internal medicine and family practice controversies, conflict and compromise . N Engl J Med 293:326-332, 1975.Crossref 6. Ingelfinger FJ: League for beleaguered internists . N Engl J Med 292:589-590, 1975.Crossref 7. Petersdorf RG: Health manpower: Numbers, distribution, quality . Ann Intern Med 82:694-701, 1975.Crossref 8. Burnum JF: What one internist does in his practice . Ann Intern Med 78:437-444, 1973.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1977

References