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THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN, THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER, AND THE INTERNIST

THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN, THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER, AND THE INTERNIST A program to train students for practice as family physicians must satisfy certain stringent requirements. The family physician's practice is not limited to internal medicine, and his training must be much broader. It must provide experience in obstetrics, pediatrics, and psychiatry. It must prepare him to deal with emergencies in a way that will facilitate, not hamper, the subsequent work of the specialist. The program wherever instituted must have an adequate administrative framework. It should lead to certification and should offer the physician an opportunity to achieve status, honor, and recognition not only before the laity but before the eyes of his professional colleagues. This can be achieved by replacing the present 12-month internship with a 24-month program based on internal medicine but broadened to give the necessary range of experience. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN, THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER, AND THE INTERNIST

JAMA , Volume 171 (11) – Nov 14, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010290001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A program to train students for practice as family physicians must satisfy certain stringent requirements. The family physician's practice is not limited to internal medicine, and his training must be much broader. It must provide experience in obstetrics, pediatrics, and psychiatry. It must prepare him to deal with emergencies in a way that will facilitate, not hamper, the subsequent work of the specialist. The program wherever instituted must have an adequate administrative framework. It should lead to certification and should offer the physician an opportunity to achieve status, honor, and recognition not only before the laity but before the eyes of his professional colleagues. This can be achieved by replacing the present 12-month internship with a 24-month program based on internal medicine but broadened to give the necessary range of experience.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 14, 1959

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