Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

THE ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE CATARRH OF THE UPPER AIR PASSAGES.

THE ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE CATARRH OF THE UPPER AIR PASSAGES. The etiology of acute catarrh is either local or exciting, predisposing or constitutional: the use of tobacco, occupations attended with much dust, smoke, irritating gases, excessive moisture or dry - ness of the atmosphere, sudden changes of atmospheric temperature, as from a dry warm to damp or damp and cold weather, or from a warm room to the cold air without being sufficiently protected with wraps, getting the feet wet, standing or sitting for some time on a cold surface, A very pernicious habit is wetting the head, which is practiced daily by young ladies, and also by mothers and nurses, who wet the hair and scalp of children one or more times daily and thus develop acute or subacute catarrh, and the child is seldom over one attack before another begins; finally chronic catarrh of the upper air passages is established. Exposure to the night air without extra wraps http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE CATARRH OF THE UPPER AIR PASSAGES.

JAMA , Volume XII (15) – Apr 13, 1889

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-etiology-pathology-and-treatment-of-acute-catarrh-of-the-upper-air-0jbimIEmZp
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1889 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1889.02400920010001b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The etiology of acute catarrh is either local or exciting, predisposing or constitutional: the use of tobacco, occupations attended with much dust, smoke, irritating gases, excessive moisture or dry - ness of the atmosphere, sudden changes of atmospheric temperature, as from a dry warm to damp or damp and cold weather, or from a warm room to the cold air without being sufficiently protected with wraps, getting the feet wet, standing or sitting for some time on a cold surface, A very pernicious habit is wetting the head, which is practiced daily by young ladies, and also by mothers and nurses, who wet the hair and scalp of children one or more times daily and thus develop acute or subacute catarrh, and the child is seldom over one attack before another begins; finally chronic catarrh of the upper air passages is established. Exposure to the night air without extra wraps

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 13, 1889

There are no references for this article.