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THE ETIOLOGY OF CHOROIDITIS.

THE ETIOLOGY OF CHOROIDITIS. The following observations regarding the causal relations of choroiditis with rubeola are the results of observations of numerous cases of this disease which have come under my observation. It has always seemed to the writer that the pathology of choroiditis has not been so definitely established or defined as to enable the practitioner to feel that he has at his command any remedy on which he can rely with definite expectation as to good results, and, in the majority of cases treated, the result has been either partial improvement, a negative result, or gradual loss of vision. In standard works on ophthalmology, the following causes of choroiditis are mentioned: eruptive diseases, syphilis, rheumatism, dysentery, meningitis, thrombosis, and infection by pyogenic organisms; the three last named causes are probably sequelæ of other diseases. Exposure to light is also mentioned as a cause, to which may be added traumatism. The following case http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE ETIOLOGY OF CHOROIDITIS.

JAMA , Volume XLIV (22) – Jun 3, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.92500490011001e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The following observations regarding the causal relations of choroiditis with rubeola are the results of observations of numerous cases of this disease which have come under my observation. It has always seemed to the writer that the pathology of choroiditis has not been so definitely established or defined as to enable the practitioner to feel that he has at his command any remedy on which he can rely with definite expectation as to good results, and, in the majority of cases treated, the result has been either partial improvement, a negative result, or gradual loss of vision. In standard works on ophthalmology, the following causes of choroiditis are mentioned: eruptive diseases, syphilis, rheumatism, dysentery, meningitis, thrombosis, and infection by pyogenic organisms; the three last named causes are probably sequelæ of other diseases. Exposure to light is also mentioned as a cause, to which may be added traumatism. The following case

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 3, 1905

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