Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE EPIPHYSEAL CHANGES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF SCURVY

THE EPIPHYSEAL CHANGES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF SCURVY The finer diagnostic features of infantile scurvy have been frequently overlooked, probably due to the fact that students of the disease have been primarily engaged with its hemorrhagic manifestations. Pediatric as well as roentgenologic texts usually exhibit roentgenograms of the femur with the heavy transverse line at its distal end and the subperiosteal hemorrhage as the essential features of scurvy. Though these are indeed unmistakable evidences of the scorbutic state, roentgenologically visible subperiosteal hemorrhage is comparatively infrequent. The heavy transverse line, the so-called "white line" of Fraenkel, has therefore been the deciding element in the roentgenogram. Focusing all our attention on it, we have frequently overlooked conspicuous signs equally characteristic of scurvy. In studying a large series of roentgenograms taken of a group of infants, I was impressed with the great variability of the photographic material. In any given pathologic condition, this may be due as much to the rapidly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE EPIPHYSEAL CHANGES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF SCURVY

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-epiphyseal-changes-in-the-diagnosis-of-scurvy-gNEN7pGNyk
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1927 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1927.04130230049006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The finer diagnostic features of infantile scurvy have been frequently overlooked, probably due to the fact that students of the disease have been primarily engaged with its hemorrhagic manifestations. Pediatric as well as roentgenologic texts usually exhibit roentgenograms of the femur with the heavy transverse line at its distal end and the subperiosteal hemorrhage as the essential features of scurvy. Though these are indeed unmistakable evidences of the scorbutic state, roentgenologically visible subperiosteal hemorrhage is comparatively infrequent. The heavy transverse line, the so-called "white line" of Fraenkel, has therefore been the deciding element in the roentgenogram. Focusing all our attention on it, we have frequently overlooked conspicuous signs equally characteristic of scurvy. In studying a large series of roentgenograms taken of a group of infants, I was impressed with the great variability of the photographic material. In any given pathologic condition, this may be due as much to the rapidly

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1927

There are no references for this article.