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The Effect of Venoarterial Bypass on Coronary Blood Flow

The Effect of Venoarterial Bypass on Coronary Blood Flow Abstract In previous reports1-3 we described a simple unoxygenated venoarterial bypass for the support of the circulation in the failing heart. Experiments in the dog uniformly showed a remarkable return of cardiac function with significant increases in the cardiac output when the bypass was instituted in the face of a fixed cardiac overload. The improvement in cardiac function was shown to be directly related to an increase in aortic root pressure, and we postulated that this elevated root pressure resulted in an increase in coronary blood flow, which in turn was responsible for the observed cardiac improvement. We have now developed techniques for measuring coronary blood flow during our bypass experiments and have found that the coronary blood flow correlates directly with cardiac function. In this report we describe these studies in detail. Technique Coronary blood flow was measured by direct and indirect methods. In eight experiments an indirect measure References 1. Connolly, J. E.; Bacaner, M. B.; Bruns, D. L.; Lowenstein, J., and Storli, E.: Mechanical Support of the Circulation in Acute Heart Failure , Surgery 44:255, 1958. 2. Bacaner, M. B.; Connolly, J. E., and Lowenstein, J.: Effects of Partially Shunting Unoxygenated Venous Blood to a Systemic Artery in Cardiac Failure , Clin. Res. Proc. 6:87, 1958. 3. Bacaner, M. B.; Connolly, J. E., and Bruns, D. L.: Veno-Arterial Perfusion as Therapy for the Failing Heart , J. Clin. Invest. 38:984, 1959. 4. Kety, S. S.: Measurement of Regional Circulation by the Local Clearance of Radioactive Sodium , Am. Heart J. 38:321, 1949.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

The Effect of Venoarterial Bypass on Coronary Blood Flow

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1960.01300010060009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In previous reports1-3 we described a simple unoxygenated venoarterial bypass for the support of the circulation in the failing heart. Experiments in the dog uniformly showed a remarkable return of cardiac function with significant increases in the cardiac output when the bypass was instituted in the face of a fixed cardiac overload. The improvement in cardiac function was shown to be directly related to an increase in aortic root pressure, and we postulated that this elevated root pressure resulted in an increase in coronary blood flow, which in turn was responsible for the observed cardiac improvement. We have now developed techniques for measuring coronary blood flow during our bypass experiments and have found that the coronary blood flow correlates directly with cardiac function. In this report we describe these studies in detail. Technique Coronary blood flow was measured by direct and indirect methods. In eight experiments an indirect measure References 1. Connolly, J. E.; Bacaner, M. B.; Bruns, D. L.; Lowenstein, J., and Storli, E.: Mechanical Support of the Circulation in Acute Heart Failure , Surgery 44:255, 1958. 2. Bacaner, M. B.; Connolly, J. E., and Lowenstein, J.: Effects of Partially Shunting Unoxygenated Venous Blood to a Systemic Artery in Cardiac Failure , Clin. Res. Proc. 6:87, 1958. 3. Bacaner, M. B.; Connolly, J. E., and Bruns, D. L.: Veno-Arterial Perfusion as Therapy for the Failing Heart , J. Clin. Invest. 38:984, 1959. 4. Kety, S. S.: Measurement of Regional Circulation by the Local Clearance of Radioactive Sodium , Am. Heart J. 38:321, 1949.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1960

References

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