Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Effect of Topical Corticosteroids in Secondary Glaucomas

The Effect of Topical Corticosteroids in Secondary Glaucomas Abstract Elevations of intraocular pressure and decreases in outflow facility have been reported after the topical administration of glucocorticoids.1-6 Marked changes have been observed in patients with proved primary openangle glaucoma, but remarkable elevations of pressure have also been noted in the families of glaucoma patients as well as in some apparently "normal" individuals. The working hypothesis was formulated that the intraocular response to topical corticosteroids was genetically determined and transmitted as a monogenic dominant.7 An alternative suggestion was that the glaucomatous eye, with its damaged outflow channels, responded more dramatically than the normal eye to the effects of steroids and related pharmacologic agents.5 One method for testing these alternate hypotheses would be to evaluate the effects of topical corticosteroids on eyes with secondary glaucomas. Since the marked response occurred in almost all eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma but only in about 35% of "normal" volunteers, such a References 1. Betamethasone is a potent, synthetic glucocorticoid (9-α-fluoro 16-β-methylprednisolone). It was supplied as a microsuspension of 0.1% betamethasone alcohol with 10% sulfacetamide by Dr. Reddin of the Schering Corporation, Bloomfield, NJ. 2. François, J.: Glaucome apparemment simple, secondaire à la cortisonothérapie locale , Ophthalmologica 142:517, 1961. 3. Goldmann, H.: Cortisone Glaucoma , Arch Ophthal 68:621, 1962.Crossref 4. Becker, B., and Mills, D. W.: Elevated Intraocular Pressure Following Corticosteroid Eye Drops , JAMA 185:884, 1963.Crossref 5. Becker, B., and Mills, D. W.: Corticosteroids and Intraocular Pressure , Arch Ophthal 70:500, 1963.Crossref 6. Armaly, M. F.: Effect of Corticosteroids on Intraocular Pressure and Fluid Dynamics: I. Effect of Dexamethasone in Normal Eye , Arch Ophthal 70:482, 1963.Crossref 7. Armaly, M. F.: Effect of Corticosteroids on Intraocular Pressure and Fluid Dynamics: II. Effect of Dexamethasone in Glaucomatous Eye , Arch Ophthal 70:492, 1963.Crossref 8. Becker, B., and Hahn, K. A.: Topical Corticosteroids and Heredity in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma , Amer J Ophthal 57:543, 1964. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Effect of Topical Corticosteroids in Secondary Glaucomas

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 72 (6) – Dec 1, 1964

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-effect-of-topical-corticosteroids-in-secondary-glaucomas-Jj0aQ8Fti0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1964.00970020771005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Elevations of intraocular pressure and decreases in outflow facility have been reported after the topical administration of glucocorticoids.1-6 Marked changes have been observed in patients with proved primary openangle glaucoma, but remarkable elevations of pressure have also been noted in the families of glaucoma patients as well as in some apparently "normal" individuals. The working hypothesis was formulated that the intraocular response to topical corticosteroids was genetically determined and transmitted as a monogenic dominant.7 An alternative suggestion was that the glaucomatous eye, with its damaged outflow channels, responded more dramatically than the normal eye to the effects of steroids and related pharmacologic agents.5 One method for testing these alternate hypotheses would be to evaluate the effects of topical corticosteroids on eyes with secondary glaucomas. Since the marked response occurred in almost all eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma but only in about 35% of "normal" volunteers, such a References 1. Betamethasone is a potent, synthetic glucocorticoid (9-α-fluoro 16-β-methylprednisolone). It was supplied as a microsuspension of 0.1% betamethasone alcohol with 10% sulfacetamide by Dr. Reddin of the Schering Corporation, Bloomfield, NJ. 2. François, J.: Glaucome apparemment simple, secondaire à la cortisonothérapie locale , Ophthalmologica 142:517, 1961. 3. Goldmann, H.: Cortisone Glaucoma , Arch Ophthal 68:621, 1962.Crossref 4. Becker, B., and Mills, D. W.: Elevated Intraocular Pressure Following Corticosteroid Eye Drops , JAMA 185:884, 1963.Crossref 5. Becker, B., and Mills, D. W.: Corticosteroids and Intraocular Pressure , Arch Ophthal 70:500, 1963.Crossref 6. Armaly, M. F.: Effect of Corticosteroids on Intraocular Pressure and Fluid Dynamics: I. Effect of Dexamethasone in Normal Eye , Arch Ophthal 70:482, 1963.Crossref 7. Armaly, M. F.: Effect of Corticosteroids on Intraocular Pressure and Fluid Dynamics: II. Effect of Dexamethasone in Glaucomatous Eye , Arch Ophthal 70:492, 1963.Crossref 8. Becker, B., and Hahn, K. A.: Topical Corticosteroids and Heredity in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma , Amer J Ophthal 57:543, 1964.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1964

References