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THE EFFECT OF SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS OF MAGNESIUM SULPHATE IN CHOREA

THE EFFECT OF SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS OF MAGNESIUM SULPHATE IN CHOREA The existence of the condition termed chorea has been well known ever since the Middle Ages. For centuries the medical profession has endeavored to treat it satisfactorily, as well as to explain its etiology. The results so far have been disappointing. Sedatives, such as bromids and chloral, the salicylates, rest, hydrotherapy, and hygienic measures, all have a beneficial influence on certain symptoms in chorea. Arsenic, however, in this condition is a greatly overestimated drug; I have yet to see it relieve, even in the slightest degree, the choreic manifestations or shorten the course of the disease. We are still sadly in want of a specific remedy to cope satisfactorily with this annoying, chronic, and occasionally serious malady. In the absence of positive knowledge as to the causation of chorea, it is justifiable to attempt symptomatic treatment alone, with the view of lessening the severity and frequency of the choreic manifestations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE EFFECT OF SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS OF MAGNESIUM SULPHATE IN CHOREA

American journal of diseases of children , Volume XII (2) – Aug 1, 1916

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1916 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110140002001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The existence of the condition termed chorea has been well known ever since the Middle Ages. For centuries the medical profession has endeavored to treat it satisfactorily, as well as to explain its etiology. The results so far have been disappointing. Sedatives, such as bromids and chloral, the salicylates, rest, hydrotherapy, and hygienic measures, all have a beneficial influence on certain symptoms in chorea. Arsenic, however, in this condition is a greatly overestimated drug; I have yet to see it relieve, even in the slightest degree, the choreic manifestations or shorten the course of the disease. We are still sadly in want of a specific remedy to cope satisfactorily with this annoying, chronic, and occasionally serious malady. In the absence of positive knowledge as to the causation of chorea, it is justifiable to attempt symptomatic treatment alone, with the view of lessening the severity and frequency of the choreic manifestations

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1916

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