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THE EFFECT OF PILOCARPINE IN A CASE OF SYMPATHICOTONIA IN CHILDHOOD

THE EFFECT OF PILOCARPINE IN A CASE OF SYMPATHICOTONIA IN CHILDHOOD The term sympathicotonia has been used by Danielopolu1 in his classification of the functional abnormalities of the vegetative nervous system to designate a hyperactivity of the sympathetic innervation as compared with that of the parasympathetic. The subject has been completely reviewed by Guillaume,2 who mentioned the lack of information concerning this condition in children and suggested the possibility that it occurs far more frequently than is supposed at present. This paper consists of the case history of a child presenting bizarre paroxysms of abdominal pain, associated with collateral observations which coincide with the clinical picture of sympthaticotonia as described previously for adults. Therapy based on the assumption that an imbalance existed between the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system was singularly successful in relieving symptoms that had existed for years, and that had previously resisted both medical and surgical treatment. REPORT OF CASE History.—D. G., a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE EFFECT OF PILOCARPINE IN A CASE OF SYMPATHICOTONIA IN CHILDHOOD

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930170109008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The term sympathicotonia has been used by Danielopolu1 in his classification of the functional abnormalities of the vegetative nervous system to designate a hyperactivity of the sympathetic innervation as compared with that of the parasympathetic. The subject has been completely reviewed by Guillaume,2 who mentioned the lack of information concerning this condition in children and suggested the possibility that it occurs far more frequently than is supposed at present. This paper consists of the case history of a child presenting bizarre paroxysms of abdominal pain, associated with collateral observations which coincide with the clinical picture of sympthaticotonia as described previously for adults. Therapy based on the assumption that an imbalance existed between the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system was singularly successful in relieving symptoms that had existed for years, and that had previously resisted both medical and surgical treatment. REPORT OF CASE History.—D. G., a

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1930

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